Search Results: "Alan Taylor"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2006

"Illuminating and evenhanded; a sturdy companion to Fred Anderson's The War That Made America (2005) and other recent studies of the colonial and postcolonial frontier."
Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor (American Colonies, 2001, etc.) turns in a grand tale "of mutual need and mutual suspicion" as Americans, Indians and the colonial powers vied for mastery of the 18th-century frontier. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 26, 1995

"Good social history, weak literary criticism, but the standout here is William Cooper himself, a true American original. (16 pages illustrations, 7 maps, not seen)"
The story of a man's spectacular career in postRevolutionary War New York and his famous son's novelistic effort to rewrite it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 9, 2013

"Full of implication, an expertly woven narrative that forces a new look at 'the peculiar institution' in a particular time and place."
Exemplary work of history by Pulitzer and Bancroft winner Taylor (History/Univ. of Virginia; Colonial America: A Very Short Introduction, 2012, etc.), who continues his deep-searching studies of American society on either side of the Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Beautifully organized and accessibly presented history for all readers."
A clear, authoritative, well-organized look at the messy Colonial march toward revolution and self-rule. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 13, 2010

"An assiduously researched, brilliantly composed explication of the war's true nature."
A Bancroft and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian's unconventional and revealing take on one of America's least understood wars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN COLONIES by Alan Taylor
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 12, 2001

"There are many good histories of Colonial America. This isn't one of them."
A history of American colonialism, broadly defined. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ALAN GRATZ
by Megan Labrise

To many Americans, the plight of refugees can seem remote—until you find their boat.

Middle-grade novelist Alan Gratz was vacationing in the Florida Keys when his family discovered an abandoned escape raft during a walk on the beach.

“It was clearly a raft from some other place in the Caribbean, trying to get to America,” says Gratz, whom Kirkus ...


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NO ONE REMEMBERS YOUR NAME, WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE
by Jennie K.

BOOK REPORT for Strange the Dreamer (Strange the Dreamer #1) (ISBN13: 978-0-316-34168-4) by Laini Taylor

Cover Story: Sparklemoth Split
BFF Charm: Yay x2
Swoonworthy Scale: 7
Talky Talk: Dreams of Libraries and Godspawn
Bonus Factors: Librarians, Tasty Business
Relationship Status: Missing My Other Half

Cover Story: Sparklemoth Split

Although I’m not crazy about the font, this is such a pretty ...


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BLOG POST

CHARLES TAYLOR

Reliant as they were on call girls, cars, corpses, and Kris Kristofferson, the B-movies of the 1970s may not qualify as high art, according to cultural critic Charles Taylor, but at least they took American audiences seriously.

“For me, the staying power of these movies has to do with the way they stand in opposition to the current juvenile state ...


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ALAN BURDICK
by Gregory McNamee

Time is fleeting. Time flies. There’s never enough of it. With apologies to Irma Thomas, the greatest interpreter of the song “Time Is On My Side,” it’s really not.

We modern humans are bound to clocks, to having to be particular places at particular moments, to occupying certain points of the space-time continuum at, well, certain points. But thus ...


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SUSAN SONTAG
by Michael Valinsky

In her new short story collection, Debriefing, Susan Sontag showcases her incredible skill at drawing readers in through jarring narrative gestures, confusing character arcs, and an unremittingly flirtatious tendency to poke fun at the possibilities of the imagination. “As a young writer Sontag wasn’t interested in the more conventional kind of fiction that was based in scene-making. She was after ...


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BOOK REVIEW

MY FRIEND THE MONSTER by Eleanor Taylor
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"Taylor's tale is just about average, but her adorable monster is a winner. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Young Louis finds a big, shaggy surprise in the family's new house. Read full book review >