Search Results: "Alan Tiegreen"


BOOK REVIEW

RAMONA QUIMBY, AGE 8 by Alan Tiegreen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 12, 1981

"Once more, Cleary shows us life through Ramona's eyes and shows her young readers that they are not alone."
Ramona begins third grade at a new school determined to do her share for the family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAMONA AND HER MOTHER by Alan Tiegreen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 15, 1979

"Ramona's friends will be gratified to see her coming along, and even her lapses remain endearing."
Cleary's sociology lags behind her child psychology when she has Ramona's average-American family celebrating, after several months of her father's unemployment, his finding a job as supermarket cashier—in our experience, a near-minimum-wage spot usually filled by 18-year-olds and part-time housewives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAMONA AND HER FATHER by Alan Tiegreen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 10, 1977

"Cleary knows, for sure."
Ramona wished she had a million dollars so her father would be fun again." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAMONA THE BRAVE by Tracy Dockray
illustrated by Tracy Dockray, by Beverly Cleary, illustrated by Alan Tiegreen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 26, 1975

After a year of kindergarten with Miss Binney who even made the Q in Ramona Quimby look like a kitty cat, Ramona finds it hard to adjust to a drab first grade teacher committed to reading circles and number combinations and avoiding waste. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAT-A-CAKE by Joanna Cole
FRIENDS AND SCHOOL
Released: Sept. 21, 1992

"Also in paperback. (Folklore. All ages)"
Thirty loving pastimes for baby and adult: rhymes to chant while dancing (``Ring Around the Rosie''), bouncing (``Trot Along to Boston''), tickling, toe-counting, face-touching, etc., each fully detailed in Tiegreen's clear cartoon-style illustrations, which are full of affection and good cheer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOCKS by Alan Tiegreen
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1973

"In the end Socks and the newcomer — young Charles William Bricker — make friends (and together make a mess of the nursery), but as cats suffering from sibling rivalry can't read, Socks' appeal will be limited to those humans who talk baby-talk to animals."
He's called Socks because of his white paws, and this is his kitten's eye view of his early life with a young college couple. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MITCH AND AMY by Alan Tiegreen
FICTION
Released: Feb. 22, 1967

"Amy conquers multiplication and Mitch advances to Wild Bill Hickok —a successful future seems assured."
It's twins this time at Mrs. Cleary's—nine years old and doing fine, thank you, after a slow start. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAMONA FOREVER by Alan Tiegreen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 15, 1984

"It's a measure of Cleary's talent and acumen that the Quinbys are as credible in the mid-1980s as they were in the mid-1950s."
So it appears—for Ramona now looks set to weather the advent of a baby sister! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUGGIE MAGGIE by Alan Tiegreen
FICTION
Released: May 23, 1990

"Still, with its' sharp observations and crisp dialogue, even second-best Cleary can hold its own with most books on this level."
The best-selling author's first novel since 1984 takes up a third-grade rite of passage: learning to write in cursive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORSE THINGS HAPPEN AT SEA! by Alan Snow
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 9, 2013

"There's foolery aplenty, but this is the sort of sequel that offers more of the same rather than any new twists or developments. (partial cast list) (Fantasy. 11-13)"
More cheese-centric shenanigans take the multispecies cast of Here Be Monsters (2006) far from the town of Ratbridge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRUTH ABOUT CATS by Alan Snow
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"But even those who dislike cats may not be in the audience for this one—it is too mild to be amusing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This companion to How Dogs Really Work (1993) explains that cats originate on Planet Nip, that they are here in a struggle for world domination, etc. The tone is tongue in cheek throughout, but the text itself is not very funny; the endless explanations will bore preschoolers, and older readers can find funnier stuff on their own. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ALAN BURDICK
by Gregory McNamee

Time is fleeting. Time flies. There’s never enough of it. With apologies to Irma Thomas, the greatest interpreter of the song “Time Is On My Side,” it’s really not.

We modern humans are bound to clocks, to having to be particular places at particular moments, to occupying certain points of the space-time continuum at, well, certain points. But thus ...


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