Search Results: "Alan de Queiroz"


BOOK REVIEW

THE MONKEY'S VOYAGE by Alan de Queiroz
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"An intriguing window into the ongoing academic debate about evolution."
An evolutionary biologist disputes the hegemonic theory of how animals have populated the planet, challenging prevailing assumptions about the time frame in which species separations necessarily occurred. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRAGEDY OF THE STREET OF FLOWERS by Eça de Queiroz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 6, 2000

"A significant addition to a magnificent—and still inexplicably underrated—body of work."
A previously unpublished novel, not quite completed before the death of the great Portuguese realist (1845-1900), that appeared in Portugal in 1980, over the objections of Eça's heirs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THINKING IN NEW BOXES by Luc de Brabandere
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"The authors provide some intriguing nuggets for thought, but the lack of discussion about the usual parameters of business success, like increasing sales, revenues, productivity and profit, is glaring."
Boston Consulting Group advisers de Brabandere (The Forgotten Half of Change: Achieving Greater Creativity Through Changes in Perception, 2005, etc.) and Iny showcase their company's approach to helping organizations develop that next big transforming idea. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED DOG by Louis de Bernières
Released: Sept. 11, 2001

"The thousands of readers who loved Corelli's Mandolin have waited impatiently for its author's next novel, so one understands why this innocuous little non-book was published. But why was it written?"
De Bernières's first book since his immensely popular fourth novel, Corelli's Mandolin (1994), is a slender collection of 15 brief interrelated tales about a legendary mutt (1971-79) who became the beloved honorary "mate" of laborers in the salt- and iron-works of northwestern coastal Australia. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ALAN GRATZ
by Megan Labrise

To many Americans, the plight of refugees can seem remote—until you find their boat.

Middle-grade novelist Alan Gratz was vacationing in the Florida Keys when his family discovered an abandoned escape raft during a walk on the beach.

“It was clearly a raft from some other place in the Caribbean, trying to get to America,” says Gratz, whom Kirkus ...


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BLOG POST

CHRISTOPHER DE HAMEL
by Brianna Jewell

“Stick your nose into other people’s business and it’s considered rude,” Christopher de Hamel says, “but stick your nose far enough back and it’s considered history.” In his latest book, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts: Twelve Journeys into the Medieval World, de Hamel turns what he sees as the voyeuristic pleasure of discovering secrets about others’ lives into historical ...


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BLOG POST

ALAN BURDICK
by Gregory McNamee

Time is fleeting. Time flies. There’s never enough of it. With apologies to Irma Thomas, the greatest interpreter of the song “Time Is On My Side,” it’s really not.

We modern humans are bound to clocks, to having to be particular places at particular moments, to occupying certain points of the space-time continuum at, well, certain points. But thus ...


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BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"A fine nonfiction collection, marred only by its rather odd title. (bibliography) (Nonfiction/collective biography. 9-14)"
Each of the five people profiled in this fascinating collection has won a National Heritage Fellowship, but young readers probably won't care about that. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORSE THINGS HAPPEN AT SEA! by Alan Snow
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 9, 2013

"There's foolery aplenty, but this is the sort of sequel that offers more of the same rather than any new twists or developments. (partial cast list) (Fantasy. 11-13)"
More cheese-centric shenanigans take the multispecies cast of Here Be Monsters (2006) far from the town of Ratbridge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRUTH ABOUT CATS by Alan Snow
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"But even those who dislike cats may not be in the audience for this one—it is too mild to be amusing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This companion to How Dogs Really Work (1993) explains that cats originate on Planet Nip, that they are here in a struggle for world domination, etc. The tone is tongue in cheek throughout, but the text itself is not very funny; the endless explanations will bore preschoolers, and older readers can find funnier stuff on their own. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AWESOME, ALMOST 100% TRUE ADVENTURES OF MATT & CRAZ by Alan Silberberg
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 23, 2013

"Readers may question Matt's and Craz's intelligence, but if the plot is short on sense, the jokes almost always work, and that's a more important brand of magic any day. (Humor. 9-13)"
It turns out that a book doesn't need to make a lick of sense if it has enough baboons and pirates and aliens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THIEF'S DAUGHTER by Alan Marks
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1994

"The ink-and-watercolor illustrations look suitably long- ago-and-far-away, with Magpie as a perpetually windblown waif. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Known as the illustrator of Paton Walsh's Birdy and the Ghosties, Marks pens his own easy-to-read fantasy, a rather muddled tale of an honest man disgraced and discharged from his court post when he is suspected of theft. Read full book review >