Search Results: "Alastair McEwan"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"An altogether fine account of a life spent doing good—and, ultimately, evil."
"To die for your ideas is the most radical of fairy tales": thus the moral of this evocative portrait by the son and heir of Italian publisher and political activist Giangiacomo Feltrinelli. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT’S GETTING LATER ALL THE TIME by Antonio Tabucchi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 29, 2006

"Of necessity somewhat fragmentary. Still, another engagingly original work from one of Europe's most interesting writers."
The impermanence and the frustrations of romantic love are evoked with sly wit and operatic brio in the versatile Italian author's newly translated 2001 confection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OCEAN SEA by Alessandro Baricco
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Silk was remarkable for its haunting clarity; Ocean Sea is a metaphysical-symbolic miasma in which the intrigued reader can only flounder."
The sea is both cradle of life and lodestone as it draws men toward madness—in this frustratingly elusive fiction,Italian musicologist Baricco's second to appear in English (the novella Silk, 1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. BLEWITT’S NOSE by Alastair Taylor
ANIMALS
Released: May 30, 2005

"EWSLUGp2003 or William Kotzwinkle's and Glenn Murray's Walter the Farting Dog (2001). (Picture book. 6-8)"
When helpful young Primrose Pumpkin finds a human nose on a park bench—"something you rarely see on an average street in a normal town on a humdrum sort of day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Anyway, an imaginative riot that should provide hours of entertainment. (Picture book. 5+)"
For Waldo fans, another oversize wordless book to pore over. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE INNOCENT by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 25, 1990

"McEwan's clinical account of dismemberment reminds us of the dark imagination displayed in his other work—it's also bound to turn off the wider audience who would otherwise enjoy this clean and clever fiction."
McEwan's latest—his best shot at a popular novel—is something of a departure from his previous work (The Child in Time, The Comfort of Strangers, etc.), but no less skillful in design or execution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWOLLOBOG by Alastair Taylor
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"For those children, especially ones who may have one of Swollobog's cousins at home, this British import will hit the spot. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A wry tall tale about a dog that eats everything—and that really means everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK DOGS by Ian McEwan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"His lapidary prose neatly disguises his search for transcendence."
As in McEwan's last novel, The Innocent (1990), the Berlin Wall plays an important symbolic role in this fictional meditation on evil—a pseudo-memoir written from a post-cold-war perspective. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON CHESIL BEACH by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2007

"This latest from England's foremost contemporary novelist feels just right."

BOOK REVIEW

ENDURING LOVE by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Painful and powerful work by one of England's best novelists."
A sad, chilling, precise exploration of deranged love, by the author of, among other works, the novels The Innocent (1990) and Black Dogs (1992). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMSTERDAM by Ian McEwan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Middle-brow fiction British style, strong on the surface, vapid at the center."
Winner of this year's Booker Prize, McEwan's latest (Black Dogs, 1992; Enduring Love, 1998) is a smartly written tale that devolves slowly into tricks and soapy vapors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COMFORT OF STRANGERS by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1981

"So, once again, McEwan seems to be a huge talent constricted by the need to preach, philosophize, or work out private obsessions; and one can only hope that writing beguiling but disappointing essay-stories like this one will free him to write more wide-ranging, full-visioned fiction in the future."
The Ian McEwan paradox continues. Read full book review >