Search Results: "Aleksandr Fursenko"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"The story traces with rich detail the maneuvering, the calculations, the human errors, and the enormous stakes involved in the most serious crisis of the last 50 years."
One of the best pieces of research to have emerged as a result of the opening of the Russian archives, a subtle, nuanced, and vivid history of the Cuban missile crisis—the East-West showdown that brought the world close to nuclear war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Sobering—even scary—and necessary reading for historians of the modern era."
A Strangelovian paradox: The only way to preserve peace is to court war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALEKSANDR BLOK by Nina Berberova
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Aleksandr Blok: A Life is Berberova's profoundly moving posthumous homage to a poet, a city, and an era she knew intimately."
Berberova's elegant and uncommon biography of the Russian poet Blok defies easy categorization and is a literary event in its own right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WARNING TO THE WEST by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 6, 1976

"Precisely because this is the worst possible time I have come to tell you about our experience over there,' he tells his labor audience—firmly, tersely, inescapably."
Probably not since Tolstoy have a writer's moral admonitions commanded the attention of Solzhenitsyn's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 17, 1978

"Westerners meanwhile can rejoice that our degenerate, debilitated society at least gives Solzhenitsyn a free hearing."
This, the text of the 1978 Harvard commencement address, falls under the heading of what Gunter Grass recently called "one of those strange antifreedom speeches" Solzhenitsyn has been giving since he came to live in the United States—but it is not merely a jeremiad denouncing Western materialism, moral laxity, loss of nerve: "the calamity of an autonomous, irreligious humanistic consciousness." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INVISIBLE ALLIES by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"But for all its heroism and insight, of all Solzhenitsyn's books this may be the least satisfactory: His respect for those who helped him and his own reticence on personal matters join to make it perhaps the closest thing he has ever written to socialist realist odes to heroic tractor drivers."
A portion of Solzhenitsyn's memoir, The Oak and the Calf (1980), that could not be published originally because it reveals his allies in the Soviet Union and how he managed to get his writings out of the country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 7, 1980

"Unsettling, but compelling."
Written in installments respectively dated 1967, 1971, 1973, and 1974, these memoirs begin with the critical and official "acceptance" of One Day In the Life of Ivan Denisovich and end with Solzheintsyn on a plane headed for West Germany, expelled. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

11/16/2010 by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"But do attempt it."
This vast, inordinately ambitious follow-up to Solzhenitsyn's long-aborning magnum opus The Red Wheel (whose first volume August 1914 appeared in English translation in 1972!), published in Russia in 1993, will alternately frustrate, exhaust, and generously reward readers willing to grapple with it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1990

This handsome facsimile of the 1925 limited French edition sports a new English text, as well as an intriguing introduction in which Rudolf Nureyev discusses Pushkin's literary career and the place of his works in the history of Russian dance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIRST CIRCLE by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Released: Sept. 1, 1968

"From Tsarist Russia to 'The Boss,' what a painfully repetitive uphill struggle, what a terrible world."
It seems clear that the works of rebellious Soviet writers have passed from the period of the "thaw" to that of power politics on an international scale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1963

"All involved in its publication (translators, introducers, etc.) claim for it great 'artistic' values which we cannot share, although there is no question of its importance as a political and human document and as significant and tangible evidence of the de-Stalinization program."
While a few weeks ago it seemed as if Praeger would have a two month lead over Dutton in their presentation of this Soviet best seller, both the "authorized" edition (Dutton's) and the "unauthorized" (Praeger's) will appear almost simultaneously. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 18, 1980

"Solzhenitsyn's organic nationalism lays behind his dogmatic rhetoric, however much obscured."
In his polemic, Nobel laureate Solzhenitsyn is becoming more fanatical with each foray down from his Vermont mountain. Read full book review >