Search Results: "Alessandro Piperno"


BOOK REVIEW

THE WORST INTENTIONS by Alessandro Piperno
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2007

"Plenty of coming-of-age novels are more cohesive and coherent than this."
A prize-winning, controversy-stirring novel in the author's native Italy, this debut won't likely have a similar impact Stateside. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIVER by Alessandro Sanna
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 27, 2014

"Along the lines of Blexbolex's Seasons (2010), an immersive visual experience that richly rewards patient attention. (afterword) (Picture book. 6-9, adult)"
An Italian illustrator makes his U.S. debut with an impressionistic record of an annual cycle along the Po River. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 2017

"The author's argument would benefit from more specific policy recommendations, but it still offers much for urban activists and disaffected Gothamites to chew on."
A searching look at how New York changed from a place of affordable (if tiny) walk-ups to a playground for the ultrawealthy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YELLOW, RED, BLUE AND IF I GET ANGRY GREY by Alessandro Sanna
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 22, 2013

"A rewarding alternative for children who find the digital edition of Hervé Tullet's Press Here (2012) too relentlessly inscrutable. (iPad play app. 4-8)"
This inventive pairing of colors with musical riffs offers almost unlimited opportunities for visual and aural experimentation—plus jigsaw puzzles for more structured entertainment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VERITAS: The Pharmacological Endgame by Alessandro Boccaletti
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 4, 2016

"An appealing tale of conspiracy and murder, occasionally interrupted by excessive particulars."
Australian scientists develop of a vaccine to eradicate obesity, which ignites a swift and ultimately lethal response from an international pharmaceutical organization in Boccaletti's (Big, Fat American Lion Book, 2016) thriller.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 2016

"A concise, informative look at the problem of obesity and the factors that make it a rapidly growing epidemic."
A short debut guide presents the common causes, complications, and cultural norms surrounding weight issues. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FORBIDDEN POWER by Max Brallier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 27, 2016

"Perhaps there is appeal for dyed-in-the-wool fans, but it's not likely to make converts. (Fantasy. 7-10)"
A misfit toy strives to fit in at his new academy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 3, 2007

"Fascinating for generals, more mundane for historians."
Another colorful recounting of a historic clash of armies, from the author of The Battle: A New History of Waterloo (2005). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WITHOUT BLOOD by Alessandro Baricco
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2004

"Baricco sails uneasily between the cheap and deep, albeit sometimes grippingly."
From Italy's prize-winning Baricco (City, 2002; Ocean Sea, 1999, etc.), a thinny-thin little tale that stretches credibility but takes up big imponderables. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. GWYN by Alessandro Baricco
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 2014

"Although the events he recounts remain cryptic, Baricco's style is lucid, and the appearance-versus-reality mind games he plays with his readers are fascinating."
Two novellas, thematically related by the theme of love...or the lack of love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CITY by Alessandro Baricco
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 11, 2002

"Reading City is like trying to play a newly marketed game whose rules aren't included in the package."
The fourth novel from the Italian author of Silk (1997) and Ocean Sea (1999) is a manic comedy set in the US, about the process of storytelling, as performed by its two protagonists: a precocious 13-year-old boy improbably called Gould, who recounts a rags-to-riches story of an unlikely boxing champion to two effectively captive listeners, and Gould's paid companion (and eventual surrogate mother), the even more improbably named—and characterized—Shatzy Shell. Read full book review >