Search Results: "Alethea Williams"


BOOK REVIEW

Naapiikoan Winter by Alethea Williams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 9, 2016

"An involving, richly atmospheric historical novel about the clash of cultures in frontier America."
The lives of two strangers converge in a 19th-century Native American encampment in this historical novel from Williams (Walls for the Wind, 2015, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLOW VALE by Alethea Williams
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A poignant story of loss, love and family."
Two people broken by World War I look to start over and take refuge in each other in this unique historical romance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUNGRY by Alethea Eason
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"The mixing of fantasy with reality doesn't quite gel and produces a weird, sometimes gruesome sci-fi adventure that may have some devouring the story ane others just nibbling. (Fiction. 10-12)"
A superior alien species has exhausted its own food supply and is about to invade earth to feed on the human population. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAREST by Alethea Kontis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"Perhaps not the best in the series; but it's hard to resist the Woodcutters' fluffy, eager-to-please charm. Monday's story next, please? (Fantasy. 11 & up)"
The Woodcutter sister with "a heart as big as the moon" meets her destiny in the third of the frothy fairy-tale series (Hero, 2013, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERO by Alethea Kontis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Whether Kontis tells the tales of other Woodcutter children or not, readers will await her next with joyful anticipation. (Fantasy. 11-18)"
The cover is terribly wrong—again—but Kontis' return to the Woodcutter family is still mightily entertaining. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 8, 2012

"Absolutely delectable; if it has more fripperies and furbelows than are strictly speaking necessary, it makes up for that in the wizardly grace of its storytelling. (Fantasy. 12-18)"
Readers who get past the generic title and an off-puttingly generic cover will discover a fabulous fairy-tale mashup that deserves hordes of avid readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I KNEW YOU'D BE LOVELY by Alethea Black
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2011

"Well-balanced collection filled with low-key charm and notable talent."
Characters struggle to overcome their fears and fulfill their desires in a cautiously upbeat set of stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALPHAOOPS! by Alethea Kontis
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"A must for preschool and elementary classrooms. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A hysterical take on what might happen if the letters of the alphabet mixed things up a bit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLIND BOY & THE LOON by Alethea Arnaquq-Baril
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"It's a tantalizing glimpse into a harsh climate and the culture it nurtures, one that will prompt discussion and may well send readers searching for the full story. (Picture book/folk tale. 5-8)"
Cels from an animated film illustrate this abbreviated retelling of an Inuit folk tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2006

"Devoted to a good cause, with more hits than misses."
Anthology of speculative fiction, with proceeds going to Save the Children's Tsunami Relief Fund. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES FROM SHAKESPEARE by Marcia Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"For readers familiar with the plays, the synopses are amusing and the watercolor depictions impressive; for those using this work as an entry to Shakespeare's works, welcome. (Picture book. 8-11)"
Seven plays—Romeo and Juliet, MacBeth, The Tempest, The Winter's Tale, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Julius Caesar, and Hamlet—have been condensed into the comic-strip panels of Williams's other retellings (The Iliad and the Odyssey, 1996, etc.); Shakespeare's words are spouted by the performers, summaries of the plot appear beneath the frames, and Elizabethan-era playgoers heckle and comment from the sides and bottom of every page—e.g., "Go on! Read full book review >