Search Results: "Alexander Pushkin"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TALE OF TSAR SALTAN by Alexander Pushkin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"The story is little more than a beam on which to hang the artwork: delicately executed, intricate paintings of scenery and costume, animals and magical events, in which Spirin shows Russian culture in all its splendor. (Picture book/folklore. 5-8)"
A tale by Pushkin, based—according to the copyright page—on a translation by Pauline Hejl and adapted for the picture-book form. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TSAR SALTAN by Alexander Pushkin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 10, 2011

"Rich in plot—and the inspiration for a popular opera by Rimsky-Korsakov—but with the look and language of an early-20th-century period piece. (iPad storybook app. 10-12, adult)"
Interactive features seem thrown in as afterthoughts, but ornately detailed new illustrations in a pre-Soviet-era style give this edition of a classic Russian short story some visual interest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOVELS, TALES, JOURNEYS by Alexander Pushkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 30, 2016

"A long overdue collection that speaks truly and well to Pushkin's brilliance as a prose stylist as well as observer of the world."
Superb gathering of writings by the short-lived author Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), best known as a poet—but, argues translator Pevear, also "the true originator of Russian prose." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1990

This handsome facsimile of the 1925 limited French edition sports a new English text, as well as an intriguing introduction in which Rudolf Nureyev discusses Pushkin's literary career and the place of his works in the history of Russian dance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EUGENE ONEGIN by Alexander Sergeevich Pushkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

"A masterly performance, and a thoroughly charming book."
Eugene Onegin ($22.00; May 1; 224 pp.; 0-465-02093-3). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MILLIE TO THE RESCUE by Alexander Steffensmeier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 13, 2013

"While difficult not to compare to Oliver Jeffers' Stuck (2011), this crazy cast of characters certainly holds its own. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Cats get stuck in trees all the time, but how does a whole farm end up there? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEVERLY BILLINGSLY TAKES THE CAKE by Alexander Stadler
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2005

"Stadler's party-colored artwork, with its thick, raw, black outlining manages to convey a tender vulnerability in all its guilelessness. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Beverly meets her match in a caramel-candy castle cake, a generous present she's making for a friend's birthday. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I’LL NEVER SHARE YOU, BLACKBOARD BEAR by Martha Alexander
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2003

"A spare and effective vote for sharing (and a good example of how to avoid a pulping), cleverly drawn by Alexander to invest the real world with watercolor dreaminess, while the fantastical bear maintains a concrete—indeed, opaque gray—presence. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Alexander adds a new tale to her much-loved series about the bear who comes to life from a drawing on a blackboard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST BOOK IN THE WORLD by Rilla Alexander
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 8, 2014

"To quote one of many exuberant, action-packed spreads: 'Enjoy the ride!' (Picture book. 4-8)"
Adding to a growing genre, this picture book shouts—no, hollers at the top of its lungs—praise to the codex. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BACK TO FRONT AND UPSIDE DOWN by Claire Alexander
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2012

"While Stan's improvement is a little too good to be true, Alexander's message is clear: 'We all have to ask for help sometimes.' (Picture book. 4-7)"
A little dog who has trouble with the mechanics of writing musters up the courage to ask his teacher for help. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEVERLY BILLINGSLY CAN’T CATCH by Alexander Stadler
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"No more. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Tired of being the last picked to play softball, Beverly and her friend Oliver—who might know how to crack the books, but never hear that sound when they swing the bat—decide to study up on the game to get better. Read full book review >