Search Results: "Alice Honeywell"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 2010

"Exhilarating fun and good motivation for armchair adventurers."
Two retirees undertake a daring cross-country bicycle trek from Oregon to Maine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHIP by Antonia Honeywell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 25, 2017

"After a harrowing launch, Honeywell's tale sails into the doldrums and sinks under the weight of haphazard plotting, uneven pacing, and subpar character work."
A sheltered teenager has an existential crisis while riding out the apocalypse aboard her father's private ark in this dystopian debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"The elegant precision of both prose and painting will speak to young readers, bringing home complicated lessons about freedom, choice, and preparedness. (Folktale. 7-10)"
There's an audacious quality to Caldecott Honor-winning Provensen's (A Visit to William Blake's Inn, 1981) work, never more so than here, where she yokes together two Chinese stories, and uses Chinese painting as the inspiration for her oil on vellum images. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMEONE IS READING THIS BOOK by Alice Priestley
ADVENTURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"The whole is a bit too wobbly—a conceit that never flies. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A prince, "handsome as most and almost as clever," sulks because he wants to fly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF MURPHY by Alice Provensen
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2003

"There is so little story that readers who do not share the author's evident enthusiasm for dog psychology may well be unimpressed; dog lovers, however, should lap this up. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Not a whole lot happens in Murphy's day beyond scavenging for food, a trip to the vet, and a flurry of late-night barking, but that's not really the point. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KLONDIKE GOLD by Alice Provensen
ADVENTURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"This commemoration not only opens a window on a historical era, it provides some sharp insight into, as the author puts it, the enduring 'get-rich-quick American myth.' (source list) (Fictionalized nonfiction. 8-10)"
Provensen shortens and fictionalizes the account of a participant in that turn-of-the-last-century gold rush, and readers will come away with not only an appreciation for the hardships those prospectors faced—and the massive quantities of gear and supplies required just to reach the remote Yukon, not to mention survive its rigors—but a clear feeling for the wild optimism that fueled the whole enterprise. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY FELLOW AMERICANS by Alice Provensen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Back matter includes Provensen's observations and reflections on her choices for inclusion and an index of names. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-8)"
A love song to America inspired by its people, with names familiar and less known. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MADAME SQUIDLEY AND BEANIE by Alice Mead
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2004

"Fans of Junebug will enjoy Beanie. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Beatrice Kingsley, Beanie, has spent the summer hanging out with her younger brother Jeremiah—Jerm—and their neighbor and Beanie's best friend Charles, who has to wear a back brace when at home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADEM'S CROSS by Alice Mead
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 22, 1996

"The story is not a pretty one, but it makes some powerful points about innocent people caught up in ethnic struggles and the horrors of life under a totalitarian regime. (Fiction. 10+)"
Adem, a 14-year-old Albanian, lives in Kosovo, a former province of what was Yugoslavia and is now controlled by the cruel and capricious Serbian military. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIRL OF KOSOVO by Alice Mead
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 11, 2001

"This difficult tale will give readers a sense of the sufferings of war and the emotional struggle needed to survive against a totalitarian state. (Fiction. 10-14)"
As in her novel Adem's Cross (1996), Mead portrays the horrors of the Balkan conflict, this time through the eyes of a young Albanian girl. Read full book review >