Search Results: "Alison J. Clarke"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"This impressive foray into the material culture of the 1950s complicates many of the truisms concerning American consumerism and suburban living during the period."
A dense, meticulously researched cultural history of Tupperware that attempts to understand the process by which objects of mass consumption are appropriated as meaningful artifacts of everyday life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIFFRAFF by J. Clarke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Broad but lively humor, with a not-too-obvious moral or two. (Fiction. 9-12)"
The author of a YA book about some comically bizarre parents—Al Capsella and the Watchdogs, 1991—zeros in on an equally bizarre preadolescent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AL CAPSELLA AND THE WATCHDOGS by J. Clarke
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 28, 1991

"What's special is Al's mellow tone: he may find his parents inconvenient or incomprehensible, but he views them with an amused tolerance that's both hilarious and endearing (and, one hopes, contagious). (Fiction. 11-15)"
In an engaging sequel to The Heroic Life of Al Capsella (1990), Al continues his affectionate sparring with parents who are almost as outlandish as they seem to his embarrassed 15-year- old eyes. Mrs. Capsella, successful author of romances, has given Al a notably lumpy, badly sewn, homemade beanbag chair that proves to contain all the ``Home Duties presents'' (apron, egg- timer, etc.) her mother had forced on her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AL CAPSELLA TAKES A VACATION by J. Clarke
FICTION
Released: May 21, 1993

"Fans may enjoy this, but it's a weaker effort all around. (Fiction. 12-16)"
In his third appearance, the 16-year-old Australian and his friend Lou hoodwink their parents into letting just the two of them vacation at Scutchthorpe, which a friend has glowingly described as a beach paradise with discos and an abundance of compliant girls. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 15, 1990

From an Australian writer, 11 stories, each with a chilling, macabre touch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DRUMS OF NOTO HANTO by J. Alison James
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"The dimension and texture of these complement James's sound-effects-laden text; the suspense builds with each beat as the villagers fight to save Noto Hanto, and readers are certain to have the pounding of drums in their ears by the story's conclusion. (Picture book. 4-8)"
On Noto Hanto, which points "upward like a thumb into the Sea of Japan," a wealthy coastal village is under threat from a warlord seeking riches. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUNA by J. Alison James
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 17, 1993

"This isn't in their league; still, it's a vivid and compelling tale. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Just before Runa arrives at her Swedish grandfather (``Morfar's'') home, she survives two life-threatening accidents- -a traffic mishap back in the US and a freak fall from the boat on the way to Gotland; once there, there's another in the old church tower, plus the unnerving discovery that, over the centuries, several girls in her family (including Morfar's sister) died accidentally on their 13th birthdays—on Midsummer's Day, as Runa's will be in a few days. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SING FOR A GENTLE RAIN by J. Alison James
Released: Oct. 30, 1990

A half-Indian teen-ager who lives with his grandfather while his singer mother is perpetually on tour is summoned backward into time by the powerful ritual song of an Anasazi girl, Spring Rain, whose grandfather believes she is destined to bear a son who will become their people's leader. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VERY GRUMPY DAY by Stella J. Jones
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2016

"The message may never grow old, but the artwork and language will. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The day dawns sweet, but a big hairy bear gets up on the wrong side of the bed and straight into Grumpsville. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

"But traveling by poem is what I recommend.' (Poetry. 8-11)"
In catchy, clever verse, the prolific Lewis (Earth and You: A Closer View, not reviewed, etc.) plays with place names, marvels at the journeys of several explorers, goes "Island Hopping," gads about the cities of Europe, even provides mnemonics to distinguish stalagmites from stalactites, and latitude from longitude—"Lines of latitude / Have a f l a t i t u d e. / Longitudinal lines / Rise like porcupines." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ANGEL AND THE CHILD by Dominique Falda
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Unusual and thought-provoking. (Picture book. 5-8)"
An unusual meditation on a brief series of events concerning a small angel on earth. Read full book review >