Search Results: "Alison Stewart"


BOOK REVIEW

JUNK by Alison Stewart
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2016

"Absorbing and enjoyably compelling research on the packrat conundrum in our society."
Quirky, immersive report on the "who, what, where, when, and why of junk." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRST CLASS by Alison Stewart
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2013

"A well-reported, passionate study of the triggers for failure and success within American urban education."
Broadcast journalist Stewart examines the legendary reputation for excellence of a historic, all-black Washington, D.C., high school, then documents the decline of that excellence in more recent decades. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DARK DAYS AND BLOOD REBELLIONS
by Thea James

What is it about the clever blend of magic and classic aristocracy that is so pleasing to read? The mix of enchantment, romance, and classism is a tried and true bouquet, from books like Sherwood Smith’s much beloved YA duology Crown Duel/Court Duel to movies like the newest iteration of Beauty and the Beast.

Like so many others who ...


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BOOK REVIEW

TOYS by David Stewart
by David Stewart, illustrated by David Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 3, 2015

"This and the other titles in the Black & White series may well become favorites for tots to chew on until they graduate to Donald Crews' graphically striking classics, such as Truck and Freight Train. (Board book. 3-18 mos.)"
There is much to talk about with baby in this sturdy, wordless, black-and-white board book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADDIS BERNER BEAR FORGETS by Joel Stewart
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 6, 2008

"Written in spare rhythmic language, the text lends itself to being read aloud; however, a close inspection of the illustrations is absolutely necessary for full understanding and enjoyment of this subtle, lovely tale. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Addis Berner Bear, a brown bear, arrives in a large, nameless city amidst the chaos of swirling snow, speeding cars and rushing holiday shoppers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEXTER BEXLEY AND THE BIG BLUE BEASTIE ON THE ROAD by Joel Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2010

"Readers will be perfectly happy just to be on the ride. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Dexter Bexley and the Big Blue Beastie are at it again in this entertaining sequel to their eponymous debut (2007). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO BREAK A HEART by Kiera Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"Although overlong and narrowly aimed at romantically minded early-adolescent girls, this story will reward tenacious readers with a touching conclusion. (Fiction. 10-13)"
After 13-year-old Mabry Collins is dropped by her heartthrob, Nick Wainwright, (her 19th straight dumping in a row), Thad Bell, a boy with his own grudge against Nick, promises to teach her how to become the yin to Nick's yang. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU HAVE SEVEN MESSAGES by Stewart Lewis
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"Dull spots and credibility issues surrounded by good moments, realistic romance and psychological insight make this a mixed bag for teenage girls. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
When 15-year-old Luna finds her dead mother's cell phone, she embarks upon a quest to learn the truth about her death and, in a larger sense, her life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 10, 1997

"The tone is admiring but balanced in this sturdy, well-researched volume, illustrated with both full-color and black-and-white photographs. (notes, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 10+)"
A solid and informative entry in the Newsmakers Biographies series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WORLD AWAY by Stewart O’Nan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

"Hands-down winner of best novel of the year award except that that year might be 1947, say, or 1948."
Granta named O'Nan one of the best new American writers, and his brilliantly executed fourth (after The Speed Queen, 1997) shows why, though it's also a long nostalgia bath, the novelistic equivalent of a loved old movie. Read full book review >