Search Results: "Alister McGrath"


BOOK REVIEW

DARKNESS SHALL FALL by Alister McGrath
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"Neither inspiring nor entertaining, just dull. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
A derivative fantasy trilogy trudges to an anticlimactic conclusion in this dreary Narnia-wannabe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2010

"Pleasing, perhaps, for its target audience, but they deserve better; Narnia this ain't. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
A slight but engaging fantasy wilts under the burden of religious allegory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Others will be interested but less engaged."
A generally well-written apologia for evangelical Christianity whose occasionally overheated prose may reflect its origins as a series of lectures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Another deeply felt entry on two divergent, yet ultimately compatible, ways of engaging the world and understanding reality."
The New Atheists have it all wrong, insists McGrath (Science and Religion/Oxford Univ.; C.S. Lewis—A Life: Eccentric Genius, Reluctant Prophet, 2013, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 2004

"Not all preaching to the choir, though—comparative-religion types at least should take a look."
Tremble, ye doubters: God isn't dead. He's back—and He's brought friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 13, 2013

"Dense for general readers but an excellent scholarly read encompassing new ideas for Lewis devotees or those interested in religious argument."
Christian theologian McGrath (Theology and Ministry/King's College London; Mere Apologetics, 2012, etc.) dissects the life of C.S. Lewis 50 years after the author's death, focusing on how his life was impacted by theology and vice versa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 10, 2001

"Neither as theologically profound nor as literary as the King James itself, but a useful and entertaining study."
Oxford don and theologian McGrath (Evangelicalism and the Future of Christianity, 1995) celebrates the King James Bible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUSE WORK by Kristina McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A domestic drama in the noblest, most wistful sense."
The quiet dignity of hard work and honest values dapples McGrath's poetic first novel with flecks of brilliance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Remote Control by Chris McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 30, 2014

"Readers initially intrigued by the story's action are likely to come away with deeper thoughts on mechanisms of control."
McGrath (Does Environmental Law Work?, 2010) delivers a thriller about suppressed truths and a secret organization bent on protecting them.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 28, 1999

"McGrath wants us to share his enthusiasm for the 'freedom and speed' of the open road, but these sluggish prose pieces and poems barely reach 55."
This fourth collection by the much-awarded (and this-round MacArthur grant recipient) Florida International University creative-writing professor continues the sense (from Spring Comes to Chicago and the other books) that McGrath fancies himself working a genre all his own: prose riffs that sometimes tell little stories but are not bound by the conventions of narrative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOST TOWN by Patrick McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 6, 2005

"Strange bedfellows, but good company."
A vision of New York as a battleground, both literal and figurative, links three spirited stories from a master of sophisticated melodrama (Port Mungo, 2004, etc.). Read full book review >