Search Results: "Allen Salkin"


BOOK REVIEW

FROM SCRATCH by Allen Salkin
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Obsessively detailed, but often too exhaustive for its own good."
Fact-packed insider dish on the unlikely rise to prominence of the Food Network. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 25, 1999

"Given the rich array of texts he marshals, Salkin should appeal not only to many Jewish men—and women—but also to others who seek guidance on becoming a mensch of a man."
A fine contribution to both the emerging fields of men's studies and the more popular, accessible branch of Jewish studies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GODS ARE BROKEN! by Jeffrey K. Salkin
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2013

"An earnest exegesis of a powerful legend of the first Jew, designed for the faithful—not for atheist or pagan readers."
A rabbi delivers a thoughtful homily on the iconoclasm of Scripture's proto-Hebrew. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON'T COPY ME! by Jonathan Allen
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"Young children acquainted with the pleasure of conspiring to annoy an older child and those who've suffered the indignity of being made fun of will enjoy seeing just who outsmarts whom. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Here's Little Puffin, minding his own business and enjoying a walk when a trio of impish gull chicks turn up and start mimicking his every move. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

“I’M NOT SANTA!” by Jonathan Allen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 23, 2008

"Allen's simple but effective illustrations, with their heavily outlined characters, are a perfect match to his simple but effective story, and he has toddler sensibilities down to a T. Carry on, Baby Owl, and tell us what else you're not. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Allen continues his amusing series about the ridiculously cute Baby Owl who in previous outings has declared himself "not cute!" and "not scared!" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRINCESS PARTY by Joy Allen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2009

"A relatively harmless if unnecessary purchase. (Picture books. 4-8)"
A sugar-shock of pink coats this perfectly nice if less-than-extraordinary addition to the princess shelf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BELINDA by Pamela Allen
by Pamela Allen, illustrated by Pamela Allen
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Australian; perfect to share with a group. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Bessie milks Belinda every day, while Old Tom grows vegetables; but when Bessie goes to visit her daughter, Old Tom is to do the milking. ``There's a good girl,'' he croons, whereupon Belinda declares her intentions with ``one almighty kick.'' She's faster than he is, and also smart enough to snatch the carrot he offers before escaping. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STRANGER IN THE MIRROR by Allen Say
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Readers willing to dig deeply may find here a protest against marginalizing the elderly; most will see it as a transformation story, more stridently earnest than David Small's Imogene's Antlers (1985), Arthur Yorinks's Louis the Fish (1980), or Anthony Browne's entire oeuvre. (Picture book. 8+)"
Thinking about his grandfather, Sam decides that he doesn't want to grow old—but he wakes up the next morning with an old man's face. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY CAT MAISIE by Pamela Allen
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1991

"A perfect blend of text and pictures to make an entertaining story. (Picture book. 3-8)"
The big boy next door has a big dog named Lobo, but Andrew has no one to play with. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"This is silly slapstick for the ears, assured by its engineering to be popular. (Pop-up. 4-8)"
This variation on the Sleeping Beauty story uses sound and motion to good effect—such good effect, in fact, that it may be too raucous for quieter institutional settings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEA WITH MILK by Allen Say
by Allen Say, illustrated by Allen Say
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1999

"A stately cousin to Ina R. Friedman's How My Parents Learned To Eat (1984), also illustrated by Say. (Picture book. 7-9)"
In describing how his parents met, Say continues to explore the ways that differing cultures can harmonize; raised near San Francisco and known as May everywhere except at home, where she is Masako, the child who will grow up to be Say's mother becomes a misfit when her family moves back to Japan. Read full book review >