Search Results: "Allison Gilbert"


BOOK REVIEW

ALLISON by Allen Say
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"He addresses the dark side of an adoptive child's feelings carefully, and while the resolution is a bit convenient (and may require interpretation for younger children), it still carries truth. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Say's trademark nuanced and limpid watercolors convey and complete the emotional resonance of this adoption story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 15, 2011

"Although somewhat repetitive, the book provides a welcome reversal of the all-too-prevalent tendency to regard the elderly as a burden rather than a resource."
Emmy Award-winning TV producer Gilbert (Always Too Soon: Voices of Support for Those Who Have Lost Both Parents, 2006) discusses "what it [is] like to be a parent without parents." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Not the definitive biography, then, and certainly not for casual G&S fans—but the most authoritative effort of its kind thus far, and, particularly considering the often-academic content, crisply readable. (16 pages b&w illustrations)"
Stedman, editor of a collection of Gilbert's non-G&S works (Gilbert Before Sullivan, 1967), now offers a solid, stylish, well- researched critical biography—which effectively emphasizes the Victorian-theater context of Gilbert's writings but fails to pay proper attention to his genius as a lyricist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Courageous Gilbert the Groundhog by Regina E. McCarthy
Released: Aug. 1, 2015

"A great resource for an elementary school counselor's office to have on hand for kids who need help managing their emotional responses."
A shy groundhog learns how to get in touch with his feelings and stand up for himself in this kids' book by debut author McCarthy and illustrator Dettman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILBERT AND SULLIVAN by Michael Ffinch
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Not without its uses, but a more balanced account would help the beginning listener enjoy these works as comic operas, not just as comic texts. (Photographs)"
Introductory guide to the life and works of the famous British duo, by poet/biographer Ffinch (G.K. Chesterton, 1987). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALLISON HEWITT IS TRAPPED by Madeleine Roux
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"A treat for lovers of groaners and roamers with neither enough gore nor pathos to keep casual readers engaged."
A fierce young bookseller blogs the zombie apocalypse in this debut novel from Wisconsin resident Roux. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILBERT THE GHOST by Guido van Genechten
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2015

"'Different' never looked so appealing. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A little ghost unapologetically makes the most of being different. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILBERT THE HERO by Jane Clarke
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2011

"This fish story smells stale already. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Big brother shark thinks quickly and saves the day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILBERT THE GREAT by Jane Clarke
ANIMALS
Released: June 5, 2005

"Youngsters will sympathize with Gilbert, and take comfort in the outcome of Clarke's sweet story, which she manages to tell with sensitivity and humor. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When his best friend Raymond moves away, Gilbert, a great white shark, is terribly sad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"A handsome addition to the author's tapestry of his Massachusetts purlieus, by now as closely observed as Gilbert White's Selborne. (Photos throughout)"
Another artful piece of creative nonfiction from Mitchell (Following the Sun, 2002, etc.) rediscovers the life of a multitalented African-American assistant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT'S EATING GILBERT GRAPE by Peter Hedges
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Hedges turns a nice phrase; in fact, all that's lacking here are content and nerve."
An ever-so-gentle coming-of-age story—a saccharine Last Picture Show—that almost smothers the evident talent of its author in an overdose of pop culture. Read full book review >