Search Results: "Aman Sethi"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 22, 2012

"Alternately sad, defiant, carefree and understated, this journey into a world hidden in plain sight is well worth taking."
A journalist ingratiates himself with a band of day laborers on the mean streets of Delhi, India. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOX WISH by Kimiko Aman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 14, 2017

"A sweet, compelling yarn that perfectly captures the archetypal childhood synthesis of fantasy and reality. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Wishes come true in this story of an unexpected, interspecies friendship imported from Japan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMAN by Aman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 12, 1994

"Nonetheless, a unique and rich account of life in a fascinating and troubled land."
A lyrical first-hand account of a complex and charismatic modern-day African heroine. ``Aman'' (a pseudonym meaning ``trustworthy'' in Arabic) is a gifted narrator who recounted her tumultuous life first to anthropologist Barnes, who died in 1990 before the project was completed, and then to Barnes's designated successor, Boddy (Cultural Anthropology/Univ. of Toronto). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WISH MAKER by Ali Sethi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2009

"Commendably ambitious, but this young Pakistani author has bitten off more than he can chew."
A dysfunctional family mirrors a dysfunctional nation in Sethi's unfocused debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIFTY FIFTY by Robbie Clipper Sethi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"A genial account of how people's lives cross and combine to create cultures: one of the best multicultural sagas to come along in a long while."
Second-novelist Sethi (The Bride Wore Red, 1996) assembles the portrait of an Indian family from several generations and as many continents as they attempt to maintain some semblance of their identity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BRIDE WORE RED by Robbie Clipper Sethi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1996

"A subtle take on a difficult subject, from a newcomer worthy to join that small, elect band who record the trials and occasional triumphs of love across the culture lines."
Fourteen stories, about half previously published in such journals as The Atlantic Monthly and Mademoiselle, sensitively examine the potentially destructive fracture that—like some cultural San Andreas Fault—haunts relationships between those of differing backgrounds. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

KOMAKO SAKAI: AN APPRECIATION
by Julie Danielson

If you’ll pardon a moment of insufferable sincerity, today’s column is a bit of a love letter to the work of Komako Sakai, one of Japan’s leading illustrators and one of my favorite artists. She has two new illustrated titles out this Spring, and I think it’s a cause for celebration.

Pictured here is a self-portrait she sent me in ...


Read the full post >