Search Results: "Ami Margolin Rome"


BOOK REVIEW

VANISHING ACTS by Phillip Margolin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"Disappointingly dull. (Mystery. 9-12)"
Cardboard characters and an unbelievable plot make this contemporary mystery feel like a Nancy Drew knock-off minus the nostalgic charm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROME by Robert Hughes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 2, 2011

"An appealing mixture of erudition about high culture and curmudgeonly complaints about low."
In the spirit of his Barcelona (1992), the art critic and cultural historian zooms through Roman history, from Romulus and Remus to today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Sleep, Cher Ami, sleep!' (Picture book. 5-9)"
During World War I, the U.S. Army relied on a flock of 600 carrier pigeons to send messages back to headquarters from troops in the field, and one, Cher Ami, became famous for saving the "Lost Battalion," which had been trapped behind enemy lines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANCIENT ROME by Judith Simpson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"The text is clear and interesting, but brief; the book is an introduction, and readers who want more in-depth coverage will have to look elsewhere. (maps, charts, glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 8-13)"
A portrait of ancient Rome, divided into four sections: ``The Roman World,'' ``Living in the Empire,'' ``Expansion and Empire,'' and ``The Fall of Rome.'' Along the way it covers the usual topics for this type of book—family life, education, farming—as well as more unusual topics, including the siege of Masada, appearing in a beautifully done four-page fold-out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER ROME by Morgan Llywelyn
Released: Feb. 19, 2013

"Llywelyn spins a tale that is interesting rather than riveting, though it is full of the rich 'stuff' of this historical period."
Life after Rome is, to say the least, barbaric, especially for those Romano-Celts still trying to make a go of it in fifth-century Albion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2008

"Evocative, entertaining and often suspenseful—sports history at a very high standard."
Timely, illuminating account of the 17th Olympiad, with its many firsts, including the first doping scandal in Olympic history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROME ANTICS by David Macaulay
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"In it, Macaulay confirms that his is not a profession, nor an obsession, but a love affair of sketching and architecture. (Picture book. 7-11)"
In another of his explorations of the traversal between A and B (Shortcut, 1995, and a detour: Why the Chicken Crossed the Road, 1987), Macaulay takes the scenic route and concludes, perhaps, that all roads really do lead to Rome. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2006

"A humorous executive summary of Edward Gibbon, part of a series on various forms of enterprise for MBA types."
In a crafty, comic case study, Bing (nom de guerre of a mid-level suit working at a conglomerate) imagines Imperial Rome as a commercial operation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOME SWEET ROME by Marissa Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2013

"Mira's latest quest leaves readers pondering what other discoveries in the past await this dauntless time traveler. (author's note, bibliography) (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Time-traveler Mira returns in a perilous mission involving the Renaissance, the Inquisition and banned books. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 12, 2007

"Don't leave for Rome without it."
A young novelist observes the Eternal City with a fresh eye. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1998

"Always informative, slightly irreverent, deeply interested, Hutchinson sometimes finds life en famille in Rome tedious but shares his excitement at discovering the extraordinary world of the Vatican with captivating enthusiasm."
Giving playful cover to a considerable bit of academic research, Hutchinson wanders with Yankee curiosity and determination through the Vatican and Rome in this guided tour of what he calls the "spiritual and political center of [a] vast international network," the "visible civic arm of the Holy See." Read full book review >