Search Results: "Aminah Robinson"


BOOK REVIEW

A STREET CALLED HOME by Aminah Robinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"There is an agreeable sentimentality to this 1940s tableaux that refuses to go pretty, a sense that readers are witnessing the real thing. (Picture book. 4-9)"
In an accordion book with flaps, an extraordinary celebration of Mount Vernon Avenue, a street that sprang from an Ohio shantytown called the Blackberry Patch that was the destination for many African-Americans pushing north during the turn of the century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO BE A DRUM by evelyn coleman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"That's the moment, in this joyful and robust chronicle, to turn to the art, where the energetic montages bustle with multi-textured backgrounds and figures, employing cloth, cotton, old buttons, sisal, wool, clay, and more, in theatrical, pulsing settings. (Picture book. 5-10)"
The drum is a mytho-poetic symbol that links people to their African roots and to the rhythm of the earth, or so Daddy Wes tells his children, Mat and Martha. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SCHOOL FOR POMPEY WALKER by Michael J. Rosen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

The collaborators on Elijah's Angel (1992) have created a remarkable novella disguised as a picture book in which Pompey Walkera composite character made up of voices and facts drawn from different slave-narrativesreminisces for a group of children in the new elementary school bearing his name. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOPHIE by Mem Fox
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"A story that will appeal more to parents than to the target audience. (Fiction/Picture book. 3-8)"
Using the relationship between an African-American girl and her grandfather, Fox (Tough Boris, p. 479, etc.) has written a simple tale about the life cycle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A fine tribute to an intriguing character; an interfaith story with true respect for both faiths. (Picture book. 5-10)"
Elijah Pierce (1892-1984) was an African-American barber in Columbus, Ohio—as well as a widely exhibited woodcarver (first prize at the International Meeting of Naive Art in Zagreb) and a lay minister. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT ANIMALS REALLY LIKE by Fiona Robinson
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"Guffaws and surprising twists (plus Timbertooth's exaggerated tantrums) will have youngsters clamoring for a repeat performance. Brava! (Picture book. 4-8)"
World-famous conductor Herbert Timberteeth (an aptly named beaver) is about to debut his new song, "What Animals Like Most." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARSEED by Spider Robinson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Still, Stardance fans will want to investigate."
Sequel to Stardance, the Robinsons' combination of dance, aliens, and politics in orbit above 21st-century Earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARMIND by Spider Robinson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1995

Third in the trilogy (Starseed, 1991, etc.) about the Stardancers, human-alien symbiotes who are able to live unprotected in space, and who can share a mingled consciousness as and when they wish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARANORMAL by Gary Robinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 2015

"A dramatic tale—or the first part of one, anyway—heavily steeped in tribal lore. (Paranormal suspense. 11-13)"
The young Cherokee seer struck by lightning in Abnormal (2014) acquires more extrasensory powers after a near-death experience in this partial sequel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROKEN PROMISES by Anitha Robinson
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 1, 2017

"A middle volume only thinly held together by overdone alien tropes. (Science fiction. 13-18)"
Kalli loses faith in Ellis and fights to free the girls housing the embryos of his dying alien species. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAWYER FOR THE CAT by Lee Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 10, 2016

"For better or worse, this cozy concludes with a bittersweet ending. Maybe the next installment (Lawyer for the Bird?) will provide a more positive resolution."
Now that she's represented a dog named Sherman, a Charleston family lawyer is naturally assigned as a cat's counsel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"A smart, tightly focused character study, by turns skeptical and generous as either is called for, of a woman worth the effort to know."
As she's portrayed here, the versatile and charismatic Mary Seacole may have been a top self-promoter, but she was also a comforter and healer of the sick and wounded, on a par with Florence Nightingale. Read full book review >