Search Results: "Amy Axelrod"


BOOK REVIEW

THE BULLET CATCH by Amy Axelrod
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2015

"An absorbing mystery enhanced by its intriguing backdrop. (Historical mystery. 10-14)"
The Axelrods take readers to World War I-era New York City for a tale of magic, mystery and crime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOUR FRIEND IN FASHION, ABBY SHAPIRO by Amy Axelrod
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2011

"Funny, lively, sensitive—a real winner. (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
In 1959, a spunky 12-year-old decides to make some money to buy a Barbie doll by writing to her Senator's beautiful wife, Jackie Kennedy, in this truly funny debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 2000

"There is more, but this kind of book may put readers off geography permanently. (Picture book. 6-9)"
The first in the News Hounds geography series opens with chatty instructions from Axelrod (Pigs on the Ball, 1998, etc.) on how to read the book—first for fun, and then for education. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIGS AT ODDS by Amy Axelrod
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"Fun.' (Picture book. 5-8)"
In this seventh picture-book title about math, Mr. and Mrs. Pig take the piglets to the county fair for a muddled introduction to probability. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A list of square-dancing terms and an author's note provide additional information. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The eighth title in the Pigs Will Be Pigs math-concept series by Axelrod and McGinley-Nally (Pigs at Odds, 2000, etc.) finds the pig family taking up square dancing and passing along lessons about spatial sense and direction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY LAST CHANCE BROTHER by Amy Axelrod
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"Though this describes a less nuanced relationship than Polacco's My Rotten Redheaded Older Brother (1994) or Kellogg's Much Bigger Than Martin (1976), it may persuade feuding sibs to lighten up, at least temporarily. (Picture book. 6-8)"
In this bellyaching monologue, a child presents a litany of offenses to justify his birthday wish that prankish older brother Gordon turn into a bug overnight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THEY’LL BELIEVE ME WHEN I’M GONE by Amy Axelrod
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2003

"More wish-fulfillment featuring the contentious sibs introduced in My Last Chance Brother (2002). (Picture book. 6-8)"
Young Max may be surrounded by laughing skeptics, but he's utterly convinced that aliens are going to take him away from his pesky big brother Gordon, broccoli, and similar nuisances. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"McGinley-Nally shows pigs running happily amok, flashing wit, knowledge, and the electric palette of a single-minded crusade against math anxiety. (Picture book. 4-9)"
In another entry in Axelrod's math-concepts series (Pigs in the Pantry, 1997, etc.) Mr. and Mrs. Pig and their piglets visit a miniature golf course for Mr. Pig's birthday, and get a crash course in simple geometry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIGS WILL BE PIGS by Amy Axelrod
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Still, the math exercise is made genuinely amusing by the domestic details and by McGinley-Nally's vibrant stylized art, which is not only lively and comical but also pleasingly decorative. (Picture book. 6-10)"
The fridge is bare, the Pig family is hungry, and they're down to their last dollar. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"Clear, persuasive, and readable, though incomplete and misleadingly organized."
Here, Axelrod, director of the Public Enterprise Project of the Rockefeller Institute of Government, argues that public authorities (government corporations) have grown to such an extent that they now constitute a ``shadow government'' whose activities are largely beyond electoral control. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATTON by Alan Axelrod
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2006

"Like Patton at his best: polished, precise and persuasive."
George Patton revolutionizes warfare while struggling with his inner demons during times of peace. Read full book review >