Search Results: "Amy Franklin-Willis"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST SAINTS OF TENNESSEE by Amy Franklin-Willis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"Franklin-Willis has a fine touch for the small-town Southern world in which she grew up and an obvious affection for her characters, if anything a surfeit of affection—Ezekiel's sensitivity strains credibility and wears the reader out."
In Franklin-Willis' first novel, set in 1985 with backward glances at three decades, a 40-something Southerner struggles to come to grips with his roles as father, son, ex-husband and twin brother. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

YOUR KISSES ARE AS WICKED AS AN F-16
by Sarah Pitre

 

BOOK REPORT for Kissing Ted Callahan (And Other Guys) by Amy Spalding

Cover Story: Not So Punk Rock
BFF Charm: Yay!
Swoonworthy Scale: 6
Talky Talk: LOL
Bonus Factors: Best Guy Friend, I'm With the Band, LA
Relationship Status: My Plus One

 

Cover Story: Not So Punk Rock

The DIY style of this cover ties in with ...


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BLOG POST

DEBORAH WILLIS
by Megan Labrise

Don’t be afraid of The Dark and Other Love Stories but be warned: Deborah Willis’s delectable fictions aren’t amorous confections.

“I think that title is a bit misleading—actually, I know it is,” says Willis, by phone from home in Calgary. “A lot of people, when I tell them the title say, That sounds so lovely! I can’t wait!” ...


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BOOK REVIEW

DON'T WAKE THE BABY by Jonathan Franklin
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 1991

"The illustrations for this commendable debut are unusual for their energy and subtle use of vivid color; the concluding twist—the baby wakes Marvin—provides a satisfying irony. Especially appropriate for a parent/preschool group. (Picture book. 3-7)"
While Mother cautions eponymously from the next room, Marvin plays rambunctious imaginative games (cowboy, magician, pirate, etc.) around his sibling's crib, finally falling asleep in the crib. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PRINCIPLES OF LOVE by Emily Franklin
FICTION
Released: July 5, 2005

"Often funny, sometimes wise, a good read. (Fiction. YA)"
The traditional saga of high-school girl meets two boys, done up with a literary and mature style. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HORRY AND THE WACCAMAW by Franklin Burroughs
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 17, 1992

"At times soporific, but largely dotted with arresting moments and wonderfully captured backwoods voices. (Drawings.)"
A six-day river journey by canoe through the Carolinas; by the author of Billy Watson's Croker Sack (1990) and winner of a Pushcart Prize for his nature essays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRLS’ ALMANAC by Emily Franklin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Fits neatly into, but never transcends, the subset of popular fiction consumed by women who love to read about, above all, themselves."
Debut collection follows from girlhood to adulthood the interconnected lives of a group of women. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INSURRECTIONS OF THE MIND by Franklin Foer
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"As this rich anthology shows, the debate over the meaning, viability and political effectiveness of liberalism continues—and not only in the pages of the New Republic."
What is liberalism? One magazine has grappled with that question for a century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Mr. Right For The Moment by Jewl Franklin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 26, 2008

"Deliciously crass with a unique focus on men who aren't the one."
After freeing herself from a long marriage marred by her husband's infidelity, a military wife rejoins the dating world only to run across more players and cheaters in Franklin's debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AT FACE VALUE by Emily Franklin
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Franklin leaves readers to guess if Cyrie will choose plastic surgery or accept herself—as her friends and family do—exactly as she is. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
This enjoyable, if lightweight, adaptation of Cyrano de Bergerac switches its genders and turns tragedy into comedy. Read full book review >