Search Results: "Amy Hempel"


BOOK REVIEW

TUMBLE HOME by Amy Hempel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 7, 1997

"Tales much like the poetry Hempel quotes: imagistic with no emotional or aesthetic heft, nor even a particular sensitivity to language."
Hempel's third volume of precious miniatures (At the Gates of the Animal Kingdom, 1990, etc.) includes a novella that reads like an inflated version of its short, fragile companion pieces, one no more than a paragraph long. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW STORIES FROM THE SOUTH by Amy Hempel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 17, 2010

"These stories are less reflective of the state of Southern fiction than the state of the contemporary short story. 'Though one's sense of geography is keen,' writes Hempel, 'it's hard to feel that there is much that separates us after reading the stories collected here.'"
The annual anthology celebrates a quarter-century with a stellar selection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DOG OF THE MARRIAGE by Amy Hempel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2005

"Sketchy, in all, with moments of the breathtaking language that characterizes Hempel's best work."
Another slim volume from Hempel (Tumble Home, 1997, etc.), the theme this time being skewed and skewered relationships (and, yes, there are dogs in many of the stories). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 2013

"An unexpected verdict and its aftermath make this a satisfying murder mystery in the grand tradition."
A suspicious death in a quaint English village sets the stage for a real-life scientific thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LUCY CAN'T SLEEP by Amy Schwartz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 7, 2012

Restless, sleepless Lucy decides to climb out of bed and wander through her hushed house. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TINY & HERCULES by Amy Schwartz
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

"Medium-saturated hues fill in fine, black outlines, and some of Tiny's postures are priceless. (Picture book. 3-6)"
This friendly cousin of Laura Vaccaro Seeger's Dog and Bear (2007) is filled with understated humor and even-tempered loyalty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT JAMES LIKES BEST by Amy Schwartz
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"Especially amusing are 'Auntie's funny hair' and Mommy's reaction when James and his playmate throw toy fruit down the stairs. (Picture book. 2-5)"
James is on the go in these four short stories targeted toward the preschool set. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BELINDA AND THE GLASS SLIPPER by Amy Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Brava, Belinda—encore! (Picture book. 3-7)"
Belinda, the ballerina with big feet, is back for her third adventure, this time in a professional ballet production of "Cinderella." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY OLD PAL, OSCAR by Amy Hest
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 3, 2016

"Hest and Bates' previous joint dog project, The Dog Who Belonged to No One (2008), was a more tender and effective narrative. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Alone at the beach, a black-and-white puppy huddles under the pier until it spots a child. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

100 THINGS THAT MAKE ME HAPPY by Amy Schwartz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"It is a book chock-full of fun—what more could one want? (Picture book. 3-8)"
Lollipop colors and utterly cheery simplicity make for a rousing read-aloud chant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON'T EAT THE BABY by Amy Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 16, 2013

"Who would have thought that threatened cannibalism could yield such a sweet and original little read in a market glutted with new-sibling stories? (Picture book. 3-7)"
They'll eat him up they love him so. Or so this new big brother fears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOX TAILS by Amy Lowry
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"Four fable favorites cleverly repackaged. (author's note, morals) (Picture book. 4-8)"
Four of Aesop's familiar fables feature wily fox shamelessly tricking his fellow creatures, followed by their gleeful retaliation, strung together in one continuous if episodic narrative. Read full book review >