Search Results: "Amy Hest"


BOOK REVIEW

THE READER by Amy Hest
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"A charming (if rather implausible) celebration of a snowy, book-y, day. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Reading anytime, anywhere is touted in this story about a boy, his dog and a snowy day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON THE NIGHT OF THE SHOOTING STAR by Amy Hest
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 12, 2017

"A gentle, empathetic tribute to the value of reaching out to welcome a new friend. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Bunny and Dog live solitary, parallel lives in adjacent homes until their shared glimpse of a shooting star engenders a new and steadfast friendship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RING AND THE WINDOW SEAT by Amy Hest
Released: Nov. 1, 1990

Old Aunt Stella tells Annie about a long-ago birthday when she had hoped to buy herself a ring with money she'd been saving for months. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY OLD PAL, OSCAR by Amy Hest
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 3, 2016

"Hest and Bates' previous joint dog project, The Dog Who Belonged to No One (2008), was a more tender and effective narrative. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Alone at the beach, a black-and-white puppy huddles under the pier until it spots a child. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LETTERS TO LEO by Amy Hest
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"In Annie, readers will find a perfectly imperfect Model Citizen, a loving daughter and good friend—in other words, someone a lot like them. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Annie introduces new dog Leo to the Rossi household in a letter of welcome and decides to keep writing, and reading, secret letters to him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2012

"Be forewarned: Youngsters will find Charley as irresistible as Henry does and will no doubt beg for puppies of their own. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The tenderness a child feels for his new puppy seeps from the pages of a book sure to be instantly beloved. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REMEMBERING MRS. ROSSI by Amy Hest
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"A tender treatment of loss and recovery. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Eight-year-old Annie is devastated by the sudden death of her mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU CAN DO IT, SAM by Amy Hest
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Endearing characters add to the sweetness and fulfillment that younger children will identify with, making this third Sam and Mrs. Bear story quite a delicious morsel. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A warm gesture of generosity has Sam and Mrs. Bear up before dawn, baking, wrapping, and delivering small cakes in red gift bags to the sleeping neighbors' doors on their snowy street. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSIE'S FISHING TRIP by Amy Hest
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 20, 1994

"Sweet. (Fiction/Picture book. 3+)"
It's not yet light outside, and despite her mild fear of the dark, nothing will keep Rosie from meeting Grampa to go fishing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON’T YOU FEEL WELL, SAM? by Amy Hest
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Just the thing to share with a little one struggling with a bout of the sniffles. (Picture book. 2-6)"
The direful sound of a toddler's cough in the night is the focus of this poignant sequel to Hest's Kiss Good Night (2001). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAJAMA PARTY by Amy Hest
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: March 12, 1992

"Still, an attractive choice for young readers who like to read about girls like themselves. (Fiction. 5-9)"
For newly independent readers, a simple story (of four-and- a-half chapters) about three eight-year-old girls who live in the same apartment building; inspired by an older sister's 13th- birthday bash, they have their first sleepover. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUBY'S STORM by Amy Hest
by Amy Hest, illustrated by Nancy Cote
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Red Riding Hood''; readers will also enjoy comparing Ruby with Steig's Brave Irene (1986), who confronts her storm in a more substantial plot and quite a different mood. (Picture book. 4-7)"
It's wet and windy, but Ruby's undaunted; she packs checkers and a snack into a basket, slips on her yellow poncho and boots, kisses Mama goodbye, and sets out through the gusty weather that's darkening her city neighborhood, blowing newspapers and umbrellas, and pelting chilly passersby with spring rain. Read full book review >