Search Results: "Amy Jackson Dixon"


BOOK REVIEW

WHO’S THAT TRIPPING OVER MY BRIDGE? by Coleen Salley
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"Salley has retired only from teaching as she proves that her expert storytelling skills are still in full bloom in this auspicious read-aloud. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Renowned storyteller and retired children's-literature professor Salley debuts as a children's author with a retelling of the Three Billy Goats Gruff story set in her home territory of southern Louisiana. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMY by Mary Hooper
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"But the near-universal obsession with chat will nevertheless make this an easy sell, and readers will enjoy this vicarious brush with danger. (Fiction. 11-15)"
A cautionary tale from Britain about love on the Internet demonstrates the influence of online chat on teenage girls on both sides of the Atlantic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JACKSON by Max Byrd
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"But the zeitgeist is embodied to perfection, and the result is a truly, and substantially, entertaining tale."
In some ways a sequel to his well-researched Jefferson (1993), Byrd's latest is a superior novel to that earlier effort—lusty and lively in its view of the American political scene, circa 1828, yet also keenly aware of the underlying issues gripping the nation as it expanded westward. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MASON & DIXON by Thomas Pynchon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 30, 1997

"Reading Pynchon may be likened to what one of his characters says here about deciphering the 'equation' presented by the stars in their courses: 'A lonely, uncompensated, perhaps even impossible Task,—yet some of us must be ever seeking it, I suppose.'"
Ever since Gravity's Rainbow (1973), which shared a National Book Award and was given, then denied a Pulitzer Prize (on account of its "obscenity"), it's been obvious, even to much of the so-called literary establishment, that Thomas Pynchon is one of our contemporary classics: a true polymath, formidably learned and technically unparalleled, who understands as few of his readers can the essential symbiosis between C.P. Snow's "two cultures" of science and technology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMY SNOW by Tracy Rees
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"Far too predictable to be truly suspenseful."
The adventures of a foundling who embarks on a treasure hunt in Victorian England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMY TAN by Barbara Kramer
BIOGRAPHY
Released: June 1, 1996

Kramer (Alice Walker, 1995) describes in a clear narrative Tan's complex personal history, her intricate Chinese-American family story, and above all, her tangled relationship with her mother as the wellsprings for her fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"The frequent, lengthy narrative asides, meant to be funny, will only add to readers' confusion and frustration. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In this absurd adventure, insecure sixth grader Jackson falls into his Great Aunt Harriett's enormous hair. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2010

"A provocative portrait sure to win as many fans and detractors as its red-hot subject."
A well-rounded treatment of one of baseball's most celebrated and controversial figures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORIES OF STEPHEN DIXON by Stephen Dixon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1994

"Faulkner Award), are also included."
This magnanimous volume marks Dixon's first publication with a mainstream house since Harper & Row brought out Quite Contrary in 1979. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MASON DIXON:  BASKETBALL DISASTERS by Claudia Mills
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 12, 2012

"Altogether, this is an amusing if undemanding account of the typical fourth-grade problems the athletically ungifted face as they make their way through school. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Fourth grader Mason Dixon, in his third series outing, earnestly stumbles from one potential disaster to another, many involving his total basketball ineptitude. Read full book review >