Search Results: "Amy Tan"


BOOK REVIEW

AMY TAN by Barbara Kramer
BIOGRAPHY
Released: June 1, 1996

Kramer (Alice Walker, 1995) describes in a clear narrative Tan's complex personal history, her intricate Chinese-American family story, and above all, her tangled relationship with her mother as the wellsprings for her fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMY by Mary Hooper
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"But the near-universal obsession with chat will nevertheless make this an easy sell, and readers will enjoy this vicarious brush with danger. (Fiction. 11-15)"
A cautionary tale from Britain about love on the Internet demonstrates the influence of online chat on teenage girls on both sides of the Atlantic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAVING FISH FROM DROWNING by Amy Tan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 18, 2005

"A pity, because this vividly imagined tale might very well have been her best yet."
Tan's ambitious fifth novel is a ghost's story (though not a ghost story), about an American tourist party's ordeal in the Southeast Asian jungles of Myanmar (formerly Burma). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KITCHEN GOD'S WIFE by Amy Tan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 27, 1991

"One can only admire Tan's talent for capturing and synthesizing the complex cultural dynamics at work here and turning them into such an intriguing, harrowing tale."
Worthy of the acclaim given The Joy Luck Club, Tan's engrossing second novel about Chinese-American culture continues the author's intricate exploration of mother-daughter relationships, generational differences, and the key way secrets define them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JOY LUCK CLUB by Amy Tan
Released: March 22, 1989

"With lantern-lit tales of old China, a rich humanity, and an acute ear for bicultural tuning, a splendid first novel—one that matches the vigor and sensitivity of Maxine Hong Kingston (The Warrior Woman, 1976; China Men, 1980) in her tributes to the abundant heritage of Chinese-Americans."
An inordinately moving, electric exploration of two warring cultures fused in love, focused on the lives of four Chinese women—who emigrated, in their youth, at various times, to San Francisco—and their very American 30-ish daughters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE THE PAST BEGINS by Amy Tan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 17, 2017

"A composite portrait that should appeal to the author's fans."
The bestselling author reflects on family, reading, writing, and language in a memoir characterized by "free-form spontaneity." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VALLEY OF AMAZEMENT by Amy Tan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"A satisfyingly complete, expertly paced yarn."
Tan, who made her name with The Joy Luck Club (1989), blends two favorite settings, Shanghai and San Francisco, in a tale that spans generations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OPPOSITE OF FATE by Amy Tan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 3, 2003

"An examined life recalled with wisdom and grace."
Novelist Tan (The Bonesetter's Daughter, 2001, etc.) offers a wry but bracing take on life and writing in this collection of her nonfiction, some previously published. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BONESETTER’S DAUGHTER by Amy Tan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 19, 2001

"Tan strikes gold once again."
Tan's fourth novel (and first in six years) wisely returns to the theme of mothers and daughters simultaneously estranged and bonded, a subject she treated so memorably in The Joy Luck Club and The Kitchen God's Wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 1999 by Amy Tan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 1999

"Perhaps less is more, after all: the more ambitious pieces here disappoint almost without exception, whereas the authors who are old-fashioned enough to want to tell a story usually manage to do just that—and quite nicely, too."
The latest in this 85-year-old series continues the tradition of putting the timely and new into a kind of yearbook of the American literary scene, this time with Tan (The Hundred Secret Senses, 1995, etc.) picking the sides and calling the shots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUNDRED SECRET SENSES by Amy Tan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 1995

"Still, fans should warm to the loving depiction of Kwan's old-world eccentricities and to the homespun precision with which the sisters' complex bond is illuminated."
Tan again revisits the rich intersection of Chinese and American female sensibilities (The Joy Luck Club, 1989; The Kitchen God's Wife, 1991), this time layering her trademark home truths on the fragile foundation of an episodic century-old ghost story. Read full book review >