Search Results: "Ana Teresa Fernandez"


BOOK REVIEW

MEN EXPLAIN THINGS TO ME by Rebecca Solnit
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 1, 2014

"Sharp narratives that illuminate and challenge the status quo of women's roles in the world. Slim in scope, but yet another good book by Solnit."
Acclaimed author and Harper's contributing editor Solnit (The Faraway Nearby, 2013, etc.) expounds on the way women are perceived in American culture and around the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOÑA INÉS VS. OBLIVION by Ana Teresa Torres
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 26, 1999

"Do§a InÇs is both a retrograde tyrant and ferocious force of nature, and Torres has brought her to life (-in-death) with stunning success."
Do§a InÇs Vs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABY TO BROOKLYN by Rajiv  Fernandez
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"The perfect baby-shower gift for Brooklyn hipsters, but all others, including the core baby-toddler audience, should 'Fuhgeddaboudit.' (Board book. 1-3)"
A baby's everyday world is paired with the sites and trends of Brooklyn, New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Hawai'i in War and Peace by Bill Fernandez
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2015

"Engrossing and identifiable."
A young teen at a Hawaiian military school near the end of World War II contemplates his future in Fernandez's (Kaua'i Kids in Peace and War, 2013, etc.) autobiographical series.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Cult of Ku by Bill Fernandez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 2, 2016

"An edifying novel that explores cultural conflicts in Hawaii between the world wars that is hampered by an overly ambitious, frequently turbid plot."
Fernandez (Kapa'a, 2015, etc.) incorporates Hawaiian history, folklore, and labor struggles into a 1920-set mystery packed with violence and murder.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Kaua'i Kids in Peace and War by Bill Fernandez
Released: Jan. 10, 2013

"A fresh take on 1930s and '40s Hawaii, with a story of childhood that will likely resonate with readers of any culture or era."
Fernandez's (Rainbows Over Kapa'a, 2009) autobiographical account of his childhood on a Hawaiian island, from the 1930s to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN TANA by Bill Fernandez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 2017

"For the setting and era alone, this ripping adventure yarn offers sufficient rewards."
Set in 19th-century Hawaii, a historical novel stars a handsome young hero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRIME & PUNISHMENT IN HAWAII by Bill Fernandez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 9, 2017

"While aspects of the story do not always sizzle, this book delivers plenty of enticing history.
"
An attorney finds trouble in paradise in this crime novel set in 1930s Hawaii. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHT EATER by Ana Juan
by Ana Juan, illustrated by Ana Juan
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"An engaging tale, made even more memorable by Juan's distinctive style and vision. (Picture book. 7-9)"
The illustrator of Campbell Geeslin's Elena's Serenade (2003) again folds humorous and theatrical elements into mystical, surrealist art for an original tale imbued with folkloric overtones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Wake Up—God’s Talking to You by Manny Dean Fernandez
NON-FICTION
Released: May 7, 2014

"Although this Christian-themed guide lacks specific how tos, it may still inspire readers to pay closer attention to their dreams."
A Bible teacher with a passion for studying dreams tells of his lifelong interest in what he believes are unique messages from God. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PET SHOP REVOLUTION by Ana Juan
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"An unsettling outing, with none of the dreamy lyricism that illuminated the artist's earlier Night Eater (2004). (Picture book. 6-8)"
This tale of a harsh pet-store owner who turns over a new leaf would be uplifting were it not so frightening. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST WAR by Ana Menéndez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 26, 2009

"A quietly piercing cultural and philosophical think-piece, comparable in its low-key, allusive moodiness to a European art-house movie."
Suspicions regarding her absent husband lead a news photographer into meditation on self-knowledge and conflict in Menéndez's latest (Loving Che, 2004, etc.). Read full book review >