Search Results: "Anabel Hernández"


BOOK REVIEW

NARCOLAND by Anabel Hernández
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"Essential reading for a serious understanding of how the war on drugs is destroying the social fabric of South American nations."
Rigorous, disturbing narrative of how drug cartels infiltrated Mexican society's highest levels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 2007

"A touching and candid portrayal of a devastating disease."
Frank memoir by Bay Area twins who battled and ultimately won the war against cystic fibrosis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN AT THE DEEP END by Anabel Donald
Released: Sept. 13, 1994

"Strongly recommended for those who like their tea cakes tart."
TV researcher Alex Tanner (An Uncommon Murder, 1993), setting up as a part-time PI, snares an improbably rich (though anonymous) client the first time out: someone willing to go through an intermediary, a plush London lawyer, to have her ascertain the state of mind of Olivier de Sauvigny Desmoulins just before he drowned in the swimming pool at Rissington Abbey, a boarding school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN UNCOMMON MURDER by Anabel Donald
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"A steadily absorbing first mystery from the author of Smile, Honey and Poor Dear Charlotte."
Nasty doings among the English gentry as seen through the cynical eyes of free-lance researcher Alex Tanner, whose tough, hard-scrabble life limits her empathy with the upper class. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GLASS CEILING by Anabel Donald
Released: Sept. 13, 1995

"Worth the time just for that."
A third installment in the improbable life of London's fetching, late-20-ish Alex TannerTV researcher and one-woman detective agency (In at the Deep End, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CUP OF WATER UNDER MY BED by Daisy Hernández
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Personal storytelling at its most authentic and heartfelt."
A journalist's account of growing up between cultures and learning to embrace both her ethnic and bisexual identities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAVE YOU SEEN MARIE? by Sandra Cisneros
Released: Oct. 8, 2012

"Neither groundbreaking nor especially penetrating, this warmhearted tale offers comfort to anyone coping with the loss of a loved one."
Best-selling Cisneros (Caramelo, 2002, etc.) chronicles a search for a runaway cat that turns into a way to work through grief and discover community. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN INNOCENT FASHION by R. J.  Hernández
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"Honest and absurd, funny and tragic, wild and lovely, this novel describes modern coming-of-age with poetic precision."
Hernández portrays the scope of dreams, love, and the fashion industry in this literary debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"There's an unfortunate cringe factor in some sloppy prose ('She likes long walks in the park and vanilla cookie-dough ice-cream from Häagen-Dazs and gets exhilarated from tap-dancing at fast speeds'), but trenchant perspectives are sprinkled throughout."
An uneven mix of essays from third-wave feminists of color. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ERANDI'S BRAIDS by Antonio Hernández Madrigal
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Although the storyline—equating the cutting of hair with sacrifice, as it was for O. Henry's young couple and Alcott's Jo—is not entirely new, dePaola's work transports readers to the innocence and austerity of a timeless Mexican village. (Picture book. 4-7)"
DePaola's signature rounded characters and folk-influenced palette invigorate this slim Mexican folktale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 20, 2002

"Well-meaning, if myopic. (Over 200 b&w photographs; documentary to air in May to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Cuban Independence.)"
Filmmaker Antón (Forever Present: Brothers to the Rescue, etc.) and journalist Hernández offer highlights of the Cuban-American experience in this companion volume to their PBS documentary. Read full book review >