Search Results: "Anchee Min"


BOOK REVIEW

WILD GINGER by Anchee Min
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 2002

"Fascinating, moving, and marvelously strange: second-novelist Min (Becoming Madame Mao, 2000; a memoir, Red Azalea, 1994) opens the door to a world that is at once terrible and compelling."
A striking story of love and betrayal re-creates the terror and animosities that informed the Chinese Cultural Revolution of the late 1960s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMPRESS ORCHID by Anchee Min
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 3, 2004

"Evocative, but underpowered in simple narrative."
Chinese-born Min's usual meticulous attention to local color (Wild Ginger, 2002, etc.) puts a brake on what should be a riveting tale—the ascent to power of China's last Empress—in a court where beheadings are as frequent as concubines are numerous. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED AZALEA by Anchee Min
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A haunting and quietly dramatic coming-of-age story with a cultural cataclysm as its backdrop."
Fascinating memoir of a young Chinese girl during the collapse of the Maoist regime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST EMPRESS by Anchee Min
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 20, 2007

"The great swatches of historical detail will enlighten readers who generally view history from a Western perspective, but with Orchid so busy explaining herself, the human story of a woman who denies her instincts never quite emerges."
In this sequel to her historical novel Empress Orchid (2004), Min tells the story of late-19th-century China's crumbling empire, from the point of view of the country's much-vilified final empress. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BECOMING MADAME MAO by Anchee Min
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"A remarkable act of historical imagination, but readers are left with more questions than answers."
The author of a wrenching memoir, Red Azalea (1994), turns to fiction and goes back to her native China to explore the story of the woman once known to the world as the `white-boned demon.` Like all girls of her class, Jiang Ching had her feet bound at the age of four. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KATHERINE by Anchee Min
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"Lyrical prose with a distinct Chinese flavor makes Min's first novel—and its times—even more poignant and resonant."
From the author of last year's Red Azalea—a highly praised memoir of growing up during the Cultural Revolution—comes a bittersweet story as much about love as about the malignant legacy of Maoist China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COOKED SEED by Anchee Min
Released: May 7, 2013

"An uplifting work of incredible grit and fortitude."
A truly rags-to-riches story from Shanghai to Chicago. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEARL OF CHINA by Anchee Min
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2010

"A straightforward biography would have served better than this flat, hagiographic narrative."
Min (The Last Empress, 2007, etc.) offers an adoring fictional biography of Pearl S. Buck. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN MU MEETS MIN by Shen Shixi
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2017

"A provocative model of amity. (Picture book. 5-8)"
An affectionate farm cat and a lovable farm dog are the best of friends as youngsters, but as they grow up, they also grow apart. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MILLICENT MIN, GIRL GENIUS by Lisa Yee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

From Yee's first sentence—"I have been accused of being anal retentive, an overachiever, and a compulsive perfectionist, like those are bad things"—this perfectly captures the humor, unique voice, and dilemma of Millicent Min, its wunderkind heroine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIN-YO AND THE MOON DRAGON by Elizabeth Hillman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1992

"Acceptable, but hardly essential. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The moon is slowly falling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHIN YU MIN AND THE GINGER CAT by Jennifer Armstrong
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"GrandPrÇ debuts with illustrations that glow with warmth, grace, and humor; her distinctive style features striking exaggerations of perspective and expression, plus an intense palette centered on red-purple and tawny orange. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Reduced to penury, the conceited widow of a Chinese official adopts an elegant cat that can catch fish with his tail. Read full book review >