Search Results: "Andrés Vera Martínez"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"Beautifully drawn and quietly evocative. (glossary, timeline, author biography, translations of Chinese characters, maps) (Graphic memoir. 9-12)"
A striking glimpse into Chinese girlhood during the 1970s and '80s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEAST by Óscar Martínez
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 8, 2013

"A harrowing look at the real costs of globalization, immigration and drug-prohibition politics, short on solutions and absent hope."
Grim, grisly account of the predations suffered by impoverished migrants on the hazardous journey to el Norte. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SANTA EVITA by Tomás Eloy Martínez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 30, 1996

"In any case, Martínez's novel is overlong, hectic, and something of a chore to get through."
Ingenious but exhausting fiction—essentially a continuation of Martínez's The Perón Novel (1988)— that examines the mercurial and enigmatic figure of Evita, the ``poverty-stricken second-rate actress'' who became both heroine and saint to Argentina's populace. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"And as a writer and thinker he did a good deal to wean Latin America off its stance of intellectual servility to the Old World."
Available in English for the first time, the greatest essays and speeches of the 19th-century Latin American educator, politician, and scholar, a leading figure in building a humanistic post-colonial tradition in Latin America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"Call it pop sociology, gonzo journalism, or social criticism: It's all good fun."
Las Vegas, the fastest-growing city in the US, as seen by a skeptical—and often funny—journalist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 3, 2001

"First-rate reporting on an important, controversial subject."
A thoughtful, politically charged narrative of travel in a little-known but much-discussed American subculture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOILING RIVER by Andrés Ruzo
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"An earnest and well-intended effort but an outline for an adventure story more than that story itself."
A brief debut book about a young, Peruvian-born geologist's adventures in the Amazon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOTHER TONGUE by Demetria Martínez
Released: Oct. 15, 1994

"Beautiful writing and astute commentary on identity, love, and El Salvadoran crises, wrapped cozy as a tamale with a maybe- happily-ever-after epilogue."
Poetry, politics, and no-holds-barred emotions burst from the tiny binding of a notable first novel by poet and activist Mart°nez (Turning, not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REGARDING RODERER by Guillermo Martínez
Released: Nov. 17, 1994

"Here, however, the narrative and the reader trot along toward a conclusion both can envision too early and too clearly."
A stiff, predictable treatment of a subject that's anything but. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VERA'S HALLOWEEN by Vera Rosenberry
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"Rosenberry has her finger on the pulse of children's anxieties—Vera's unhappy adventure and its comforting resolution is on just the right scale for preschoolers. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Little sister Ruthie is going trick-or-treating before dark, but this year Vera gets to join older sisters June and Elaine with their father in "the spooky night." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VERA RIDES A BIKE by Vera Rosenberry
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2004

"The top-drawer story comes with equally fine artwork—soaked watercolors that unfurl across the page—and characterizations, from Vera's poses to her trim, Botticelli-esque mother's clodhoppers. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A welcome return of Vera, Rosenberry's rough-cut alter-ego. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GROWING-UP TREE by Vera Rosenberry
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2003

"Unsettling. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In this Giving Tree-like parable, infant Alfred and his mother seem to float in a sort of fecund and fantastic Eden, rife with less-than-subtle and sometimes disconcerting symbols of fertility. Read full book review >