Search Results: "Andrea Beck"


BOOK REVIEW

PIERRE LE POOF! by Andrea Beck
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"It's a charming enough canine caper, but, like Pierre, it lacks the vigor of the classic Harry the Dirty Dog. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A pampered poodle dreams of running free while his owner preps him to be a champion show-dog in this first of a projected series of Pierre adventures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELLIOT'S EMERGENCY by Andrea Beck
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"The coaching Elliot gets on learning to sew hints at self- sufficiency, without becoming didactic. (Picture book. 3-7)"
If a torn seam for a stuffed toy is like a skinned knee for a child, it's no wonder that Elliot the moose turns to his other toy friends for help in keeping his stuffing from falling out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELLIOT’S NOISY NIGHT by Andrea Beck
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"MPQUOTEPAGECOUNT 802) or the shelf full of other takes on the theme. (Picture book. 5-7)"
The plush moose gets past another common domestic challenge in this seventh outing in the industry known as Elliot (Elliot Gets Stuck, not reviewed, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELLIOT’S BATH by Andrea Beck
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"Fans of the books will not be disappointed, but there's not much else to recommend. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Several stuffed animals run into a problem when Socks the monkey inadvertently spills paint on herself and on Elliot the plush moose. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BEST BOOKS OF 2016: ANDREA DAVIS PINKNEY
by Poornima Apte

Long before “We Need Diverse Books” gained momentum as a movement towards inclusivity in children’s literature, writer and illustrator Ezra Jack Keats made history. Peter, the star of his groundbreaking picture book, The Snowy Day, was black.

Children’s book author Andrea Davis Pinkney reminds us what a big deal this was in 1962 when the book was first published. The ...


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BOOK REVIEW

A BUNNY IN THE BALLET by Robert Beck
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2014

"Alas, not the stuff of dreams for balletomane readers. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Toe shoes and tutus are the stuff of dreams for a rabbit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEPITO THE BRAVE by Scott Beck
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"Sly, assuring, and paint-box bright, this is a snappy salute to independence and adventure. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Newcomer Beck's book has two winning ingredients: an engaging, spunky main character and the kind of color last seen 50 years ago on fruit-crate labels: buffed but with bite, the better to get your attention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"When the tension- and suspense-free climax finally occurs, it's hard to care. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Focusing on secondary characters from This Book Isn't Fat, It's Fabulous (2008), this companion novel falls flat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Dead Brother Club by Coren Beck
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR

"Engaging proof of the need for an anchor in our lives, adolescent or otherwise."
A pastor's memoir chronicles his embrace of faith as a way of giving his life purpose in the wake of devastating tragedy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REVENGE OF KALI-RA by K.K. Beck
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 3, 1999

"Not much more suspense than its Fu Manchu models, but a broadly comic Midsummer Night's Penny Dreadful—or, as one cast member sagely dubs it, 'an uplifting story of madness and wellness.'"
Valerian Ricardo, author of the fabulously trashy adventures of the beauteous Kali-Ra, Queen of Doom, died years ago—even the copyright on his Edgar Rice Burroughs—esque fantasies has lapsed—but they're back in the news again now that fairy godmother Nadia Wentworth, the bankable Hollywood star of the opulent bustline and limited vocabulary, has discovered them and decided that she was born to play the Queen of Doom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HOPELESS CASE by K.K. Beck
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1992

"Manages to stay just this side of silliness and be mildly entertaining in the process."
Here, the author moves away from her frequent 20's milieu (Peril Under the Palms, etc.) and into the life of one Jane da Silva, expatriate widow of a racing-car driver, brought back from Europe to her Seattle hometown by a legacy from her uncle Harold. Read full book review >