Search Results: "Andrew Delbanco"


BOOK REVIEW

COLLEGE by Andrew Delbanco
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2012

"Although stronger on diagnosis than cure, this is an impassioned call for a corrupt system to heal itself."
Has the democratic ideal of a classical education, open to rich and poor alike, become a thing of the past? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

In a brilliant review of how American writers of the last two centuries have confronted evil by depicting it, Delbanco (Humanities/Columbia Univ.; The Puritan Ordeal, not reviewed) suggests that our postmodern inability to name evil puts us in danger of being dominated by it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Ranging learnedly and widely, this is less a work of scholarship, on which it is deeply based, than a personal testament to the melancholy to which learning has led its author."
Reflections on American conceptions of happiness and hope—and of how they have grown weak. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MELVILLE by Andrew Delbanco
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 23, 2005

"Lively and endlessly informative: a welcome addition to literary history, of a piece with Louis Menand's Metaphysical Club and David Reynolds's Walt Whitman's America."
A graceful, sympathetic portrait of a writer all but forgotten in his day, but now seen as central to understanding the American character. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"For now, then, no matter. Read this for the writers—Alcott, O'Connor, Frost, Jewett—and if you tire of them, read 20 others. This is a smorgasbord; we are unlikely to see its kind again soon. (9 halftones, not seen)"
Who and what made New England the nation's intellectual and literary center is apparent in this expansive collection of writings by the abiding masters and luminaries of the day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A deeply felt, persuasive, and eminently useful work."
Vigorous, engaging essays (many originally published in the New Republic) on the revolutionary impulses of 19th- and 20th- century writers, ``inspired practitioners of the American language,'' offering an explicit repudiation of the more arid contemporary forms of literary criticism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDREW DRAWS by David McPhail
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"Inspiring. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A young boy discovers he can work magic with his drawings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDREW JOHNSON by Annette Gordon-Reed
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 18, 2011

"Gordon-Reed incorporates views by Johnson's other biographers to create a fleshed-out, many-sided portrait."
A fair-minded, toned-down portrait of a deeply problematic president who could not rise to the country's challenge after the Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"One happy and spirited object lesson in what tenacity can bring. (Nonfiction. 10 & up)"
A well-told tale of a young filmmaker's progress. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDREW JACKSON by H.W. Brands
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 18, 2005

"Brands illuminates the life of an American original while shedding light on such matters as the conquest of Texas and the origins of the Civil War. A pleasure for history buffs."
Industrial-strength historian Brands (Lone Star Nation, 2004, etc.), prolific in the Ambrose-McCullough vein, turns his attention to oft-overlooked Old Hickory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDREW WYETH by Richard Meryman
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: June 1, 1991

"Excellent color reproductions with full citations; b&w photos; index. (Biography. 11+)"
In the ``First Impressions'' series, a detailed, perceptive portrait of a contemporary painter who has received both critical admiration and popular acclaim, by a long-time friend who first wrote about Wyeth in the 60's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 26, 2012

"This cleareyed, intelligent memoir is an invaluable resource for anyone whose life is affected by a developmental disability.
"
Wyllie (Bertram Goodhue, 2007, etc.) moves away from architectural histories to document the life of her son, Andrew, who persevered and thrived despite Down syndrome. Read full book review >