Search Results: "Andrew Ferguson"


BOOK REVIEW

LAND OF LINCOLN by Andrew Ferguson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2007

"Colorful, opinionated, openly hostile to the new historians—and great fun to read. "
A search for traces of the Great Emancipator in today's America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST BOYS SYMPHONY by Mark Andrew Ferguson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 24, 2015

"An auspicious debut that blends a number of disparate-seeming tones into something surprisingly coherent—and moving."
Ferguson's playful debut novel mixes a coming-of-age story with time travel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOOLS' NAMES, FOOLS' FACES by Andrew Ferguson
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 4, 1996

"Flaws aside, this is rarely a dull book, but it is carelessly compiled, and Ferguson spends too much time looking over other writers' shoulders."
A collection of short, somewhat topical, somewhat humorous essays by a self-described ``journalistic hit man.'' From H.L. Mencken to Tom Wolfe to P.J. O'Rourke the right has enjoyed a proud tradition of wickedly acerbic and satirical cultural criticism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2011

"At a remove, Ferguson is downright smart and entertaining; in the thick of it, you feel his pain."
The college-admissions process scrubs Weekly Standard senior editor Ferguson (Land of Lincoln: Adventures in Abe's America, 2007, etc.) like a Brillo pad in this droll, tart chronicle of his son's progress to Big State U. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"Essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how technology is changing American policing."
A survey of predictive policing: how data makes it possible, its benefits and pitfalls, and what it may portend for American law enforcement and race relations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2013

"A genuine encouragement that speaks to the role juries play in our constitutional structure."
An investigation and celebration of what we so often rue: jury duty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ANGEL OF DEATH by Alane Ferguson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"An entertaining read. (Fiction. YA)"
Her rare talent for examining corpses and an aching secret separates 17-year-old Cameryn from her friends and family in this mystery by Edgar Award-winning author Ferguson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2005

"Serviceable but ponderous. Best for those engaged in humanitarian-aid and international-development work, but readers seeking depth on the Aral issue will do better to turn to Tom Bissell's much superior Chasing the Sea (2003)."
The Aral Sea of Central Asia has all but disappeared within the space of a generation. Writes international-aid consultant and debut author Ferguson, "the disaster was ultimately caused by the sort of mad obsession that lays claim to the human conscience when it carries out a murder." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 13, 2013

"The author's apocalypse will result from conservative bugaboos, and he delivers an entertaining, often convincing polemic."
As Oswald Spengler's massive 1918 classic Decline of the West approaches its 100th anniversary, announcements of the apocalypse continue to pour off the presses. Readers could do much worse than read this one from the prolific Ferguson (History/Harvard Univ.; Civilization: The West and the Rest, 2011). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Blue's Point by Richard Ferguson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 11, 2014

"Respectful and astute handling of serious social conflicts in a satisfying yarn."
In Ferguson's (The Thin Line Between Life and Death, 2013, etc.) thriller, a just-released convict and a journalist travel to a small Texas town where racial tension breeds contempt and violence.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"Helpful graphs and tabular material throughout."
An arresting collection of revisionist essays that (despite what will strike most readers as a surfeit of donnish baggage) put a fresh spin on Tip O'Neill's dictum that money is the mother's milk of politics. Read full book review >