Search Results: "Andrew J. Bacevich"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 3, 2010

"Welcome rethinking by a former military man who has seen the light."
Retired Army colonel Council of Foreign Relations member Bacevich (History and International Relations/Boston Univ.; The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism, 2008, etc.) discards long-held "habits of conformity," rethinking America's mission abroad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"A mixture of passion, dismay and cynicism, with streaks of perhaps hopeless hope."
A former military officer and current professor assails the concept of the current all-volunteer Army and the general disconnect between the military and civilians. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHORT AMERICAN CENTURY by Andrew J. Bacevich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 19, 2012

"Bracing and provocative, despite the tendentiousness and the uniformity of structure."
A set of scholarly responses to Henry Luce's 1941 essay in his Life magazine, "The American Century." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 5, 2016

"An immensely readable, nondidactic study of how 'perpetuating the War for the Greater Middle East is not enhancing American freedom, abundance, and security. If anything, it is having the opposite effect.'"
A critical examination of the four decades-long failed U.S. policy of using military force to solve the ongoing crises in the Middle East. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Well-reasoned and eloquently argued."
A retired U.S. Army colonel makes the case for a more modest American posture on the world stage, including less use of the military. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

J by Howard Jacobson
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A pleasure, as reading Jacobson always is—though much different from what we've come to expect, which is not at all a bad thing."
Jacobson (The Finkler Question, 2010, etc.), Britain's answer to Philip Roth, returns with an enigmatic tale of the near future.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"One happy and spirited object lesson in what tenacity can bring. (Nonfiction. 10 & up)"
A well-told tale of a young filmmaker's progress. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDREW JACKSON by H.W. Brands
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 18, 2005

"Brands illuminates the life of an American original while shedding light on such matters as the conquest of Texas and the origins of the Civil War. A pleasure for history buffs."
Industrial-strength historian Brands (Lone Star Nation, 2004, etc.), prolific in the Ambrose-McCullough vein, turns his attention to oft-overlooked Old Hickory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDREW WYETH by Richard Meryman
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: June 1, 1991

"Excellent color reproductions with full citations; b&w photos; index. (Biography. 11+)"
In the ``First Impressions'' series, a detailed, perceptive portrait of a contemporary painter who has received both critical admiration and popular acclaim, by a long-time friend who first wrote about Wyeth in the 60's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDREW DRAWS by David McPhail
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"Inspiring. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A young boy discovers he can work magic with his drawings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDREW JOHNSON by Annette Gordon-Reed
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 18, 2011

"Gordon-Reed incorporates views by Johnson's other biographers to create a fleshed-out, many-sided portrait."
A fair-minded, toned-down portrait of a deeply problematic president who could not rise to the country's challenge after the Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JEMIMA J by Jane Green
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 14, 2000

"Slightly unpredictable story development saves this from exactly duplicating the vast mound of similar feel-good modern fairy tales for women, but it lives in the same neighborhood."
An overweight woman turns from ugly duckling to swan in British novelist Green's American debut: a tale that offers plenty of engaging plot twists but not much substance. Read full book review >