Search Results: "Andrew Martin"


BOOK REVIEW

THE NECROPOLIS RAILWAY by Andrew Martin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 15, 2007

"Martin's debut, loaded with railway lore, pairs a lively, often macabre look at turn-of-the-century London with a bang-up mystery."
A naïve young railway man has a chance to fulfill his lifelong dream of becoming an engine driver, if only he can survive a series of murderous attacks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLACKPOOL HIGHFLYER by Andrew Martin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2007

"Brisk and atmospheric, the middle volume of a proposed trilogy."
When his train is nearly derailed, a young Yorkshire railwayman once more turns sleuth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER AT DEVIATION JUNCTION by Andrew Martin
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 6, 2009

"In Jim's fourth adventure (The Lost Luggage Porter, 2008, etc.), Martin again shares his infectious passion for trains, wrapped in a nifty caper."
A body in the snow vaults ambitious Jim Stringer into another perilous adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE YELLOW DIAMOND by Andrew Martin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Full of memorable character portraits and incisive observations on wealth and social class, this stylish departure by the author of the long-running Jim Stringer series (Night Train to Jamalpur, 2014, etc.) is full of droll humor."
When a veteran detective is shot while on special assignment, uncovering the truth involves layers of deceit and secrets that might be best left unrevealed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST LUGGAGE PORTER by Andrew Martin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Stringer's third adventure (The Blackpool Highflyer, 2007, etc.) has the same engaging voice and lively splashes of historical color as his others."
An eager young railroad detective goes undercover. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MAKING UP HISTORY (BUT MAKING IT FEEL REAL)
by Claiborne Smith

When debut authors talk about their struggles to get published, their stories usually boil down to a dramatic tale of numbers, despite the literary context: X number of writing workshops they attended, X number of years spent working on the debut, X number of rejections from agents or publishers. Andrew Hilleman, whose electric, compelling debut novel, World, Chase Me Down ...


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BLOG POST

MY CHILDREN'S BOOK GHOST FILE
by Julie Danielson

Over at NPR last week, I heard a pop culture critic talk (here) about what he calls his Ghost File, or the books, television shows, and movies he didn’t review during the year. “[I]t's the great frustration,” he said, “that every year I'm haunted by all the terrific things I haven't talked about … ...


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BLOG POST

GLORIOUS BASTARDS
by Thea James

I look around, from face to face. We all knew the same thing. We were in this together.

Until the very end.

Sixteen-year-old Tilla is the daughter of Lord Kent, preeminent noble of the Western Province. She is also a bastard—and try as she might to impress her father, there’s no changing the fact that her mother was a lowly ...


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BITCH PLANET AND ANOTHER CASTLE - GRIMOIRE

I recently read two trades that on the surface, could not be more different but which underneath present similar arcs of feminist liberation.

Bitch Planet: President Bitch is the second volume in the ongoing dystopian science fiction saga written by Kelly Sue DeConnick and illustrated by Valentine De Landro. The series is set in a futurist world where the Patriarchy ...


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BLOG POST

ANDREW SEAN GREER
by Megan Labrise

For bestselling novelist Andrew Sean Greer, Less represents a grand departure in more ways than one.

“I was writing another book that was my typical style,” says the author of five preceding fictions, including The Path of Minor Planets and The Confessions of Max Tivoli, “sort of poignant, sort of wistful. And I was getting nowhere with ...


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BLOG POST

CIVIL RIGHTS THEN AND NOW
by Leila Roy

In celebration and honor of this weekend’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, let’s take a look at some of the recent and upcoming books about the Civil Rights Movement!

While they are certainly not the most recent books on the list, John Lewis’ March: Book One, Two, and Three are most immediately on my mind—partly because Lewis is the last ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 27, 2012

"A persuasive if discouraging argument that nuclear power offers different but no less nasty environmental problems than burning hydrocarbons."
Emerging from its 20-year, post-Chernobyl recession, the nuclear-power industry is building new plants around the world—a terrible idea according to this angry, intensively researched, unsympathetic analysis. Read full book review >