Search Results: "Andrew Potok"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 4, 2002

"No pity or paternalism here, just the interesting confluence of technology and activism."
Edifying portraits of activists, therapists, technicians, and others working to help the disabled participate more fully in mainstream American life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 14, 1978

"But with the many good scholarly and popular treatments of Jewish history on the market, there's no real need for this one."
A failed tour de force: picturesque but amateurish history by a professional novelist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I AM THE CLAY by Chaim  Potok
Released: May 15, 1992

"Potok has created a landscape of horror and beauty that seems charged with spirits—both malevolent and benign—and a human landscape where, against the terror of empty meaninglessness, only connection offers salvation."
At first glance, this acutely moving novel by the author of The Chosen and other stories of punishing spiritual journeys within Orthodox Judaism, may seem a departure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY NAME IS ASHER LEV by Chaim  Potok
Released: April 1, 1972

"But Potok, as in The Chosen, is able to sustain a singleminded gloomy intensity and will attract the same audience, assisted by the Literary Guild selection."
This features the agonizing young years of Asher Lev caught between the imperatives of his Hasid family's dynastic destiny and the forbidden visions of the goyische world of art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE BEGINNING by Chaim  Potok
Released: Oct. 1, 1975

Chaim Potok continues his saga of the American sojourn of the Chosen People with this portrait of the education of David Lurie—namesake of his gentle and beautiful uncle dead in a Polish pogrom, son of a fiercely militant Zionist organizer—as he learns what his "job" in the service of the Jews will be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF LIGHTS by Chaim  Potok
Released: Oct. 16, 1981

"A dark tapestry of a book, then, more suggestive than powerful, with threads that may reach out and hold a surprising range of readers."
Yes, Potok (In The Beginning, The Chosen) is once again following a young Jewish protagonist on a journey that ends, somewhat too perfunctorily, with a reaffirmation of Faith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"While not on a par with his best fiction, this Potok offering will engage many readers, particularly those with vivid memories of the struggles of, and for, Soviet Jews."
Potok, whose novels of families at odds with themselves ring so true (I Am the Clay, 1992, etc.), turns his attention to a deeply divided real-life family of Russian Jews. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHOSEN by Chaim  Potok
Released: April 28, 1967

"If they 'rub their tzitzis for good luck,'—perhaps—although we doubt it."
This first novel, ostensibly about the friendship between two boys, Reuven and Danny, from the time when they are fourteen on opposing yeshiva ball clubs, is actually a gently didactic differentiation between two aspects of the Jewish faith, the Hasidic and the Orthodox. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZEBRA by Chaim  Potok
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

In six quietly powerful stories, Potok (The Sky of Now, 1995; for adults, The Gates of November, 1996; etc.) explores varieties of inner and outer healing, both in individuals and in families: "Zebra" begins to regain use of his crushed hand and leg creating art assigned by an itinerant teacher; after the deaths of her father and brother, "Isabel" finds unexpected solace in the company of her new stepsister; the spirit of "Max," a larger-than-life family hero killed in Vietnam, resurfaces in the next generation not in his namesake, as expected, but in young Emmie; although her father returns after a brief desertion, "B.B." loses the utter trust of her childhood; "Moon" lets out his adolescent rage in an explosive musical tribute to a murdered Pakistani child slave. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVITA'S HARP by Chaim  Potok
Released: March 11, 1985

Jason's family is making their ``third move in five years''; once again, Jason says good-bye to his friends and packs his belongings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PROMISE by Chaim  Potok
Released: Sept. 15, 1969

"Somber, meticulous in religious matters, although a bit muddled in psychoanalytical processes and practices, with dialogue as thuddingly persistent as a pendulum, this is nonetheless, snugly secure in the wake of The Chosen."
This tributary from the surprisingly successful The Chosen (1967) pursues the careers of Reuven young Orthodox student awaiting his examination for the Rabbinate, and Danny, the "liberated" Hasid. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIFT OF ASHER LEV by Chaim  Potok
Released: May 11, 1990

"But, then again, there is that restless, eager journeying in the dark—and then the sudden shimmerings of possibility—in odysseys of the soul that gives Potok's spiritually searching novels their saving strength."
In this sequel to My Name is Asher Lev (1972), the author of The Chosen (1967) and Davita's Harp (1985)—as well as other fictional probes of the rich complexities of Jewish Orthodoxy—brings his protagonist artist back to the Hasidic community in Brooklyn from France. Read full book review >