Search Results: "Andrew Rosenheim"


BOOK REVIEW

FEAR ITSELF by Andrew Rosenheim
Released: Oct. 25, 2012

"A rich premise, with a readable if sometimes predictable and heavy-handed delivery."
Serviceable historical thriller from publishing veteran Rosenheim. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ACCIDENTAL AGENT by Andrew Rosenheim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Still, Alan Furst can breathe easy. Rosenheim's story has its merits, but it's slack, too full of banter, and not full enough of car chases, explosions, and dead Nazis to satisfy."
Junior G-man Jimmy Nessheim graduates to the big time, and the Gestapo and NKVD alike are taking notice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE TOKYO INFORMANT by Andrew Rosenheim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 29, 2013

"Genial, leisurely political suspense that fails to deliver thrills."
Rosenheim (Fear Itself, 2012, etc.) brings back swashbuckling Special Agent Jimmy Nessheim in a noirish World War II-era thriller that's rich in atmosphere if light on momentum. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MAKING UP HISTORY (BUT MAKING IT FEEL REAL)
by Claiborne Smith

When debut authors talk about their struggles to get published, their stories usually boil down to a dramatic tale of numbers, despite the literary context: X number of writing workshops they attended, X number of years spent working on the debut, X number of rejections from agents or publishers. Andrew Hilleman, whose electric, compelling debut novel, World, Chase Me Down ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 15, 2000

"An author's note includes extensive information on the sources and research for the story; a bibliography and map of key sites are also included. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Today's kids might not know the name of Daniel Boone (or what a coonskin cap is), but this original tall tale explains why Boone wore that distinctive hat as a boy, and why he stopped wearing it, too. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"An inventive take-off on the boyhood lives of Willy and Orv, as they called each other, two curious and imaginative boys who became famous for launching aviation history. (Picture book/biography. 5-8)"
With his typically breezy illustrations, Glass puts a different spin on the story of the Wright brothers, recreating a childhood incident in the spirit of a folk tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHARLES T. McBIDDLE by Andrew  Glass
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"In words and pictures, Glass effectively parlays an archetypal rite of passage into an even more universal message. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A classic childhood monster comes out of the bedroom closet (where it frequently lurks in children's books) and climbs onto Charles Tarzan McBiddle's bike. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CREATURE ABC by Andrew Zuckerman
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Older children won't tire of staring into the eyes and souls of such beautiful, mysterious creatures. (Picture book. 3-8)"
This adaption of Zuckerman's adult pictorial Creature (2007) uses white backdrops in striking juxtaposition with brilliantly detailed photographs to introduce animals and the ABCs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LET'S FIND MOMO! by Andrew Knapp
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 18, 2017

"Colorful, kid-friendly fun—and Momo! What more could readers want? (Board book. 2-5)"
Books, blog, Instagram, and Facebook—where else can readers find Momo? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LES & RONNIE STEP OUT by Andrew Kolb
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 26, 2017

"This odd couple doesn't need any lessons on friendship, though perhaps they could use some pointers on safe skateboarding. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A Type-A personality learns to walk in someone else's shoes (literally!) after an accident. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRIENDS FOR LIFE by Andrew Norriss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"An appealing afterlife account with an important message. (Fiction. 10-15)"
A phantom friend makes a life-changing difference in the lives of three English middle schoolers. Read full book review >