Search Results: "Anita Liberty"


BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: July 1, 2008

"Whether teens will find her particular brand of bitter commentary wickedly funny or profoundly annoying depends largely on taste, but this is an undeniably authentic and original tale of adolescence. (Fiction. YA)"
In this first offering for young adults by performance artist Liberty, a pastiche of formats is employed to create the cynical fictional memoir of a supremely angst-ridden teen during her final two years of high school in New York City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBERTY by Kirby Larson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Practically perfect. (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
A white boy's love for a dog crosses social divisions in this World War II story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBERTY! by Thomas Fleming
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Lacking in analytical depth, but packed with narrative insight into personalities and often delicious minutiae. (300 color illustrations) (Book-of-the-Month Club main selection; History Book Club selection)"
Bestselling historian and novelist Fleming (Remember the Morning, p. 1049) offers a solid popular history of America's era of unrest, revolution, and constitutional government (176389) in this lavishly illustrated companion volume to a three-part PBS series airing in November. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBERTY by Andrea Portes
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 6, 2017

"A fun—and even funnier—thriller. (Thriller. 14-adult)"
If your journalist parents are dead—or "probably dead"—why not become a spy and an assassin? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBERTY by Stephen Coonts
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 4, 2003

"Plodding, simple-minded post-9/11 thriller that rarely thrills."
In this latest us-against-them from Coonts (America, 2001, etc.), terrorists are once again trying to smuggle nuclear weapons into the US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARRYING ANITA by Anita Jain
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 4, 2008

"A sparkling, enjoyable look at how globalization affects love."
Single Indian-American female, 33, seeks worldly yet marriage-minded man abroad and finds a complex blend of perspectives on relationships. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBERTY! by Allan Drummond
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 3, 2002

"An author's note introduces the story, separating the facts of the day from those details he imagined and giving more historical information about Lady Liberty. (Picture book. 4-10)"
On the day of its unveiling, the flag covering the Statue of Liberty's face was mistakenly lowered too soon; Drummond imagines how it happened. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBERTY by Lynn Curlee
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2000

"While the text is occasionally pompous, and perhaps not as much fun as the Betsy and Guilio Maestro book on the same subject, Liberty is an engaging and useful resource for the classroom and library. (specifications, timeline, bibliography) (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-12)"
This is a comprehensive, fact-filled, and stunningly illustrated history of the Statue of Liberty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBERTY by Garrison Keillor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2008

"'Living in Lake Wobegon was like being stuck in a bad marriage,' thinks Clint, leaving the rest of the novel to resolve whether the Bunsens' marriage is worse than most."
One of the funnier Lake Wobegon novels might be the saddest as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2007

"The narrative round-robin can be chaotic. Still, an attractive book for those with an interest in women's history of the period."
A fascinating, if disjointed, hagiography of six women often overlooked by the history books despite their behind-the-scenes involvement in the cultural affairs and politics of Revolutionary France. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANITA AND ME by Meera Syal
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1997

"Far from just another coming-of-age saga, Syal's impressive debut offers a charming yet troubling evocation of recent times."
Nine-year-old Meena Kumar's cheeky narrative of her life as the only Punjabi girl in a small English village unfolds through wonderfully evocative description. Read full book review >