Search Results: "Ann B. Knox"


BOOK REVIEW

LATE SUMMER BREAK by Ann B. Knox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1995

"Only a few pages long, the stories often leave the reader wanting more—and Knox sometimes settles for obvious symbolism (a dog's death reminds a childless couple of their miscarriage)—but, still, a worthy start."
A debut collection of 14 stories about reconciliation, isolation, and connection—with narrators, usually women, who are seeking to strengthen and understand their bonds to mothers and children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISS JULIA TAKES OVER by Ann B. Ross
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 23, 2001

"Earnest and a bit too heartwarming: still, a good yarn with some nice local color."
This follow-up to Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind (1999) takes up where the first installment left off. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISS JULIA ROCKS THE CRADLE by Ann B. Ross
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 2011

"Sanctimonious and then some, with much quoting of Scripture and gossip from the neighbors."
Steel magnolias kick butt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ETTA MAE'S WORST BAD-LUCK DAY by Ann B. Ross
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 19, 2014

"Much of the same Southern-fried slapstick from Ross; only for fans of the series."
In the 16th installment of the Abbotsville novels, Miss Julia steps to the margins so sexy Etta Mae Wiggins, collector of Barbies and lover of men, can enter the spotlight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISS JULIA DELIVERS THE GOODS by Ann B. Ross
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 20, 2009

"Ross's tenth (Miss Julia Paints the Town, 2008, etc.) focuses more on Hazel Marie's plight than on the thin mystery. But fans will be delighted that quirky Miss Julia is back."
A starchy North Carolina lady finds herself with some perplexing problems no proper lady should ever have to face. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISS JULIA LAYS DOWN THE LAW by Ann B. Ross
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 7, 2015

"Can Julia, now in her 16th installment (Miss Julia's Marvelous Makeover, 2014, etc.), possibly be as naïve as she continues to appear? Die-hard fans will brush this question aside and relish the surprise ending."
A Southern gentlewoman's nerves are shredded after she finds a body—and not for the reason you'd expect. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT DO COWBOYS LIKE? by Ann B. Tracy
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"With its brevity and insular feel, this novel would have been better served if targeted to the YA market."
It is a sign of this novel's scantiness that it fails to explain satisfactorily the answer to the question posed in its own title. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISS JULIA STIRS UP TROUBLE by Ann B. Ross
Released: April 9, 2013

"Ross' tale seems to belong to another age: one in which women need to beautify to hold onto their cheating husbands and a teenager isn't the most Internet-savvy person in town."
The 14th installment of the Miss Julia series offers the usual fare: some meddling, a light mystery and a reliable set of down-home Southerners. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISS JULIA INHERITS A MESS by Ann B. Ross
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 2016

"Slow as molasses, Miss Julia's 16th (Miss Julia Lays Down the Law, 2015, etc.) barely qualifies as a mystery, counting instead on Southern charm to delight the fan base."
No good deed goes unpunished for Miss Julia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUMMERLAND by Malcolm Knox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"A debut made up much less of observed and felt life than of absorbed fiction. Let's see what Knox does when he writes his own book."
The world of Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan is re-created with a puzzling mixture of stylistic grace and slavish imitation, in a confident first novel by a young Australian writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST GODDESS by Tom Knox
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 6, 2012

"Knox does shed some light on actual 'hybridization' experiments ordered by Stalin, among other leaders. In the end, the Khmer massacres are too enormous in their inhumanity to function as the backdrop for a thriller.
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After learning of the horrific crossbreeding experiments conducted by the Khmer Rouge during the '70s—and the international conspiracy of silence that surrounds those experiments still—a female archaeologist and male photographer have their lives threatened and their sanity questioned. Read full book review >