Search Results: "Ann Jones"


BOOK REVIEW

MARY ANN by Betsy James
by Betsy James, illustrated by Betsy James
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"A note offers sensible advice on keeping a mantis. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When her best friend moves away, Amy feels bereft: ``I wish there were hundreds and hundreds of Mary Anns,'' she tells Daddy, imagining that it wouldn't matter, then, if one moved away. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANN TENNA by Marisa Acocella Marchetto
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Zany with a touch of uplifting. You will be measurably hipper after reading it."
A high-spirited graphic novel skewers the Twitterati. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY ANN IN AUTUMN by Armistead Maupin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 2, 2010

"Agreeable entertainment until the ridiculous denouement."
Maupin continues his popular Tales of the City saga (Michael Tolliver Lives, 2007, etc.) with the return to San Francisco of Mary Ann Singleton after 20 years in the cushy Connecticut suburbs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASPER JONES by Craig Silvey
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 12, 2011

"A richly rewarding exploration of truth and lies by a masterful storyteller. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Charlie is catapulted into adulthood when Jasper Jones knocks on his window on a blisteringly hot Australian night and leads him to a hidden glade where a girl is hanging from a tree, bruised and bloody. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIPPYJON JONES by Judy Schachner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Both feline hero and story are full of beans (more Mexican-jumping than pinto) but ay caramba, mucho fun. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Skippyjon Jones insists he's not a Siamese cat despite ears too big for his head and a head too big for his body. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHUCK JONES by Hugh Kenner
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"The other two are Greg Sarris's Mabel McKay: Weaving the Dream, profiling the Pomo basket weaver and medicine woman, and Yvonne Fern's Gene Roddenberry: The Last Conversation, a discussion with the creator of Star Trek."
Dr. Seuss created the Grinch, but it took Chuck Jones to make him move. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THANKSGIVING FOR EMILY ANN by Teresa Johnston
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 26, 2014

"While there are few books that even mention kids' complaints about the November holiday, the majority of Thanksgiving-themed books address gratitude much more meaningfully (and realistically). (Picture book. 3-5)"
A kid's perspective on Thanksgiving Day points out all the inconveniences of the holiday. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KIZZY ANN STAMPS by Jeri Watts
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"The vivid historical setting of this short and satisfying read will leave readers feeling they have experienced life in Kizzy Ann's world. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
With the abundance of stories about a boy and his dog, it's refreshing to see a tale of a girl and her dog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SALLY ANN THUNDER ANN WHIRLWIND CROCKETT by Steven Kellogg
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The straight-faced recounting of these far-fetched adventures is paced perfectly for a read-aloud; readers will yearn for Kellogg (who includes a careful source note) to hatch still more eggs from his storytelling basket. (Picture book/folklore. 6-10)"
A perennial favorite follows Kellogg's other tall tales (Mike Fink, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEISHA ANN CAN! by Daniel Kirk
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2008

"One caveat: Readers of a certain generation may find themselves reading aloud to the rhythm of the 'Candy Man' song. (Picture book. 4-7)"
With jaunty rhymes and a spunky heroine brimming with a go-to attitude, Kirk's sprightly tale encourages readers to let their inner star shine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEARLESS JONES by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

Even before sultry Elana Love walks into mild-mannered Paris Minton's life three months after his Watts bookstore opens, Mosley can't resist his signature scene: A pair of cops stroll into the shop determined to push Paris around just because he's a black man and it's 1954. Read full book review >