Search Results: "Ann Rinaldi"


BOOK REVIEW

JULIET’S MOON by Ann Rinaldi
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2008

"One of Rinaldi's best. ('what happened next,' author's note, bibliography) (Fiction. 10 & up)"
"At your age, all you should be worried about is clothes and boys and reading Moll Flanders," Seth tells his 12-year-old sister, Juliet Bradshaw. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEIGH ANN’S CIVIL WAR by Ann Rinaldi
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"A mess. (author's note, bibliography) (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Veteran Rinaldi spins a tale that combines low melodrama, cringeworthy faux-Indian mysticism, a back story only the author could possibly understand, a saccharine depiction of slavery, two pregnancies of convenience and only a passing regard for historical accuracy for a nearly 300-page slog that seems to have enjoyed zero editorial intervention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1999

Beginning with slow, laboring words that lead first to ghastly realization, and then to mature understanding, Rinaldi (Cast Two Shadows, 1998, etc.) explores some of the tragic fates of Native American children during the late 1800s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAST TWO SHADOWS by Ann Rinaldi
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Anna Myers's Keeping Room (1997), a less disingenuous story set in the same place and time, offers a more direct view of the unusual brutality that characterized the war in the Carolinas. (bibliography) (Fiction. 12-15)"
Skeletons come and go from a wealthy South Carolina family's closet when the British army arrives in this tale set during the Revolutionary War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMELIA'S WAR by Ann Rinaldi
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

Rinaldi (My Heart is on the Ground, p. 228, etc.) makes character count in a rousing novel that is more than a portrait of a town and a people divided during the Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"A tragic tale, beautifully written and researched. (Fiction. 12+)"
The short and not very happy life of America's first black poet, brought to vibrant life by Rinaldi (The Blue Door, p. 1241, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COME JUNETEENTH by Ann Rinaldi
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2007

"Stick to the McKissacks' nonfiction Days of Jubilee (2003) and wait for a more accurate novel on the subject. (Historical fiction. 11-15)"
Technically owned by the Holcomb family's Aunt Sophia, the illegitimate "high yellow" Sis Goose (named for a Brer Rabbit-type story) has lived her entire life as an adopted and favorite member of the wealthy Texas family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY VICKSBURG by Ann Rinaldi
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2009

"There's no excuse for this one. (Historical fiction. 10 & up)"
A two-page bibliography demonstrates that no amount of book research can compensate for cultural tone-deafness and a willful disregard for coherent plotting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MINE EYES HAVE SEEN by Ann Rinaldi
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"It's a powerful story, and for readers who find the large cast hard to keep track of, Rinaldi recapitulates in an afterword, and appends a bibliography. (Fiction. 12-15)"
John Brown spent the summer before his quixotic 1859 raid on the Harpers Ferry arsenal secretly marshalling men and weapons on a nearby farm, with two women, one his 15-year-old daughter Annie, to keep house and present the appearance of normality to prying eyes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIRL IN BLUE by Ann Rinaldi
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"Accurate or not, this is only one of a series of missteps that will disappoint readers used to Rinaldi's talent. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Loosely based on an actual woman who disguised herself as a soldier during the Civil War, this historical novel tells the story of Michigan farm girl Sarah Wheelock, who becomes first a solider and then a detective for the Pinkerton Agency in Washington. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 28, 1994

"This tale of treachery comes alive under her pen. (Historical fiction. 12+)"
In 1778 Rebecca Syng, the teenager who narrates this story, is sent to be a lady's maid in the Shippen household in Philadelphia. Read full book review >