Search Results: "Ann Rule"


BOOK REVIEW

PRACTICE TO DECEIVE by Ann Rule
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 8, 2013

"Rule's die-hard fans may be enamored, but other true-crime fans won't find much more than a yawn lurking between these pages."
The reigning true-crime queen dips into the darker side of love and mayhem in her latest microscopic take on homicide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 15, 2001

"Exploitative and sad."
Bestselling true-crime specialist Rule (Bitter Harvest, 1998, etc.) certainly has her fans, but here her leering, hyperventilating style is merely distasteful. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 3, 1998

"Impossible to put down (though a little skimpy on psychiatric details), this is, thanks to the vivid, fascinating portrait of Debora and of the slow unraveling of her homicidal schemes, one of Rule's best. (24 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A tour de force from America's best true-crime writer (Dead by Sunset, 1985, etc). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Not enough forensic detail for the blood-and-fiber crowd, but this is a terrific read and a moving tale that ends with a strange redemption. (32 pages b&w photos, 1 map, not seen) (Author tour)"
Sufficiently creepy stuff from the master of true crime: This book is better-plotted than the murder itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1991

"Second-drawer Rule, but shocking and juicy nonetheless."
Child abuse, adultery, and murder permeate this potentially gripping but overwritten southern California crime story from the best-selling author of Small Sacrifices, The Stranger Beside Me, etc. David Brown was the consummate Eighties entrepreneur: a computer wizard with his own business, plenty of cash, and a home in Orange County's conservative enclave. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 3, 1992

"A headlong plunge into the depths of a sociopathic mind, told with a master's hand. (Photographs—24 pp. b&w—not seen.)"
Here, as in Small Sacrifices (1987), Rule (If You Really Loved Me, 1991, etc.) re-creates the compelling story of a woman hellbent on gratification and devoid of conscience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY ANN by Betsy James
by Betsy James, illustrated by Betsy James
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"A note offers sensible advice on keeping a mantis. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When her best friend moves away, Amy feels bereft: ``I wish there were hundreds and hundreds of Mary Anns,'' she tells Daddy, imagining that it wouldn't matter, then, if one moved away. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SALLY ANN THUNDER ANN WHIRLWIND CROCKETT by Steven Kellogg
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The straight-faced recounting of these far-fetched adventures is paced perfectly for a read-aloud; readers will yearn for Kellogg (who includes a careful source note) to hatch still more eggs from his storytelling basket. (Picture book/folklore. 6-10)"
A perennial favorite follows Kellogg's other tall tales (Mike Fink, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANN TENNA by Marisa Acocella Marchetto
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Zany with a touch of uplifting. You will be measurably hipper after reading it."
A high-spirited graphic novel skewers the Twitterati. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEISHA ANN CAN! by Daniel Kirk
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2008

"One caveat: Readers of a certain generation may find themselves reading aloud to the rhythm of the 'Candy Man' song. (Picture book. 4-7)"
With jaunty rhymes and a spunky heroine brimming with a go-to attitude, Kirk's sprightly tale encourages readers to let their inner star shine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY ANN IN AUTUMN by Armistead Maupin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 2, 2010

"Agreeable entertainment until the ridiculous denouement."
Maupin continues his popular Tales of the City saga (Michael Tolliver Lives, 2007, etc.) with the return to San Francisco of Mary Ann Singleton after 20 years in the cushy Connecticut suburbs. Read full book review >