Search Results: "Annalena McAfee"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SPOILER by Annalena McAfee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 18, 2012

"McAfee writes with sparkling intelligence and raises serious issues about the relationship between reporting and truth."
A sharp, intelligent novel about "old" journalism, "new" journalism and the moral gap between the two. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAME by Annalena McAfee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2017

"Impressive worldbuilding, but to what end?"
An idiosyncratic and ambitious novel from the author of The Spoiler (2012). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CLIMBING TREE by Carol McAfee
Released: May 9, 1989

A below-par first novel † la Mary Higgins Clark, in which Kate, an attractive Baltimore assistant district attorney, sends Slick, a vicious thug, to jail—only to have him escape and stalk her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WALK AMONG BIRCHES by Carol McAfee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Predictable healing epiphanies (complete with frequent quotes from Robert Frost) come too easily in a story that strains to be profound and moving."
McAfee (The Climbing Tree, 1989, etc.) saves her self-absorbed, suicidal protagonist by the miraculous power of the obvious insight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 19, 2017

"Provocative reading for futurists, investors, and inventors."
Science fiction? Your wallet is soaking in it, as this textbook-ish look at the "second machine age" tells us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLOW WALK IN A SAD RAIN by John P. McAfee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

"As fiction, it's well- meaning, occasionally original, but mostly derivative."
A first novel, set at a Special Forces camp in the Laotian jungle, that tries to do for Vietnam what Vonnegut did for WW II, though McAfee's style—one-sentence paragraphs displayed ad nauseam—is merely choppy instead of stoic or absurdist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 20, 2014

"Valuable reading for policymakers."
A hopeful view of the future as we enter a second machine age. Read full book review >