Search Results: "Anne Mazer"


BOOK REVIEW

MOOSE STREET by Anne Mazer
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A book with an important message, skillfully delivered. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Living in the well-established neighborhood of Moose Street (which could be in Syracuse, N. Y., where Mazer grew up with her author parents), 11-year-old Lena Rosen's activities are typical of the 60's (or the 90's): playing with friends and avoiding enemies while watching her baby sister in the park; feeling friendly toward a classmate despite his bullying brother and abusive home; coping with an art teacher who's unappreciative of her imaginative response to an assignment, and with teasing because she is a ``brain''; being kind, just once, to the class outcast. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 27, 1995

"For that, and for frequent cultural insights, this is a worthwhile resource. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
A companion volume to a previous anthology of fiction, America Street (not reviewed), this is an earnest collection of autobiographical essays by writers of various ethnic backgrounds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OXBOY by Anne Mazer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A provocative, unusually imaginative tale. (Fiction. 9-14)"
The form of Mazer's second novel—a stark fable concerning the intermarriage of people and animals—is in striking contrast to the contemporary school-and-neighborhood story in Moose Street (1992), yet its theme is the same: the effects of intolerance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SLIVER OF GLASS AND OTHER UNCOMMON TALES by Anne Mazer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"An uneven collection, with some eerie high points. (Fiction. 9-11)"
Eleven ``horror'' tales that are not as uncommon as the title would have it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORKING DAYS by Anne Mazer
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: July 15, 1997

"Stories by Marilyn Sachs, Victor Mart°nez, and Lois Metzger are among those included; almost without exception, the pieces are thought-provoking and consciousness-raising, and are certain to ring a bell with teenagers working, unemployed, or planning their careers. (Fiction. 12+)"
The connection between going to work and growing up are explored in this excellent collection from Mazer (Going Where I'm Coming From, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPILLING INK by Anne Mazer
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2010

"The best of recent volumes on the subject. (introduction, appendix) (Nonfiction. 9-14)"
Two prolific writers for children offer advice on the writing process for young writers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY BROTHER ABE by Harry Mazer
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 6, 2009

Well timed to catch the wave of interest that's likely to rise for the bicentennial of Lincoln's birth, this historical tale zeroes in on the personalities of ten-year-old Abe, his mother Nancy and his father Thomas—all as seen through the eyes of his sister Sally, two years his senior. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BOY NO MORE by Harry Mazer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"But under the weight of his family, work, school, and a tentative romance with a slightly older girl, the core and newly resonant issue of knowing when and if loyalty to friend and country contradict, loses its focus and urgency. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In wartime, should a person help a friend whose parents are immigrants from an enemy nation? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO IS EDDIE LEONARD? by Harry Mazer
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Still, entertaining; but for a deeper and more astute, look at this theme, try Alcock's taut The Cuckoo Sister (1986). (Fiction. 12-16)"
Shortly after the death of the grandmother who raised him, Eddie—who knows no other family save an uncle who once gave him a dog, then took it away, and who has since disappeared—sees a notice about Jason Diaz, missing since the age of three. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIGHT DAYS, STUPID NIGHTS by Norma Fox Mazer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Better-than- average light fare. (Fiction. 11-15)"
Two prolific, reliable YA authors set a knotty contemporary issue—privacy vs. the right to know—in an accessible story about four teens, summer interns on a small-town paper. Read full book review >