Search Results: "Anne Shelby"


BOOK REVIEW

THE MAN WHO LIVED IN A HOLLOW TREE by Anne Shelby
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 10, 2009

"Nicely done. (author's, illustrator's notes, key to quilt squares) (Picture book. 4-7)"
This rich tale, based on an Appalachian legend, tells the story of the improvised life of Harlan Burch, a philosophical carpenter who builds everything from cradles to coffins and plants two trees for every one he cuts down. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SOMEDAY HOUSE by Anne Shelby
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1996

"Pair this with Eve Bunting's Fly Away Home (1991) or Elizabeth Hathorn's Way Home (1994) to set younger readers thinking. (Picture book. 5-7)"
This flight of imagination by Shelby (Homeplace, 1995, etc.) has a poignant cast. ``Someday,'' promises the narrator, ``we'll live in a house on a mountain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 8, 2007

"Includes a note on the origins of the tales. (Folktales. 8-12)"
Brave and brainy, trusty and true, Molly Whuppie is not about to let anyone stop her—not even a giant who is ready for a meal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POTLUCK by Anne Shelby
by Anne Shelby, illustrated by Irene Trivas
ABC BOOKS
Released: March 1, 1991

"Delicious. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Setting their table for 31, Alpha and Betty call their friends in for an alphabetical feast: ``Ben brought bagels...Don did dumplings,'' and so on, with some nifty longer improvisations: ``Norman knew that oodles of noodles would be needed.'' The extra five? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOMEPLACE by Anne Shelby
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1995

This quick skip through seven generations of farmers living in the same, ever-expanding house seems less a celebration of family roots than a showcase for Halperin's distinctive talents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OF ENEMIES AND ENDINGS by Shelby Bach
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 30, 2015

"A satisfying conclusion to a sword-and-sorcery series with a feminist fairy-tale twist. (Fantasy. 9-13)"
Finally 14, Rory Landon gets to complete her own tale, taking on the Snow Queen and all her evil allies with the help of her classmates at the Ever After School. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BY DAWN’S EARLY LIGHT by Philip Shelby
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 2001

"Turgid prose, formulaic plotting, characters as lively as wooden carvings. Your call."
More conspiracy kitsch from Shelby (Gatekeeper, 1998, etc.), centering this time on those inscrutable Chinese. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GATEKEEPER by Philip Shelby
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 1998

"Still, likable Hollis will probably keep reader interest from flagging until past the half-way mark."
The best thing about Shelby's latest thriller (Days of Drums, 1997, etc.) is his dewy-eyed heroine, who almost, but not quite, saves the day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEPTEMBER, SEPTEMBER by Shelby Foote
Released: Feb. 1, 1977

"When Foote's own generally lean and direct narration is in charge of the action and the solid Memphis atmosphere, September works as a straightforwardly effective slice-of-crime; in trying to beef it into more—with the Little Rock headlines, the sentimental psychology, the overemphatic sex—he blunts the suspense and exposes a host of old-fashioned novelist seams."
Twenty-five years after Shiloh, historian Foote (The Civil War: A Narrative) returns to Southern fiction and to his multiple-viewpoint narrative technique, here applied—with mixed results—to a kidnapping in Memphis, September 1957. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PANAMA by Shelby Hiatt
ROMANCE
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Lovely. (Historical fiction. 14 & up)"
Hiatt's impressive debut offers a new take on teen obsession, tempered in the exotic Panamanian jungle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOOTPRINTS by Shelby Hearon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 21, 1996

"Hearon skimps on character—Douglas and Nan are at times reduced by the novel's weighty concerns to lecturing, hectoring shells—but even so this is a bright, involving work, if more somber than Hearon's others."
The author of Life Estates (1994), among other portraits of women struggling through a Sargasso of ego-entanglements, here tracks a marriage splintering in an agony of deep grief after the death of a beloved daughter. ``A lot of wishes and feelings lay buried in a person, then something like this tragedy comes along and uncovers them.'' So declares Douglas, sorrowful husband of Nan, who narrates here. Read full book review >