Search Results: "Anthony Read"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2004

"Each was effective in his own way, and Read's narrative gives Hitler's lieutenants their due for their roles in making the Nazi state the efficient death machine that it was—squabbling with one another all the while and endlessly jockeying for position."
Hermann Göring to Heinrich Himmler, April 1945: "Herr Reich Marshal . . . if anything should prevent you from succeeding the Führer—say you are eliminated—can I have the position?" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1998

"But their history is a stirring achievement."
A change of pace for the authors, who have written extensively on Germany (The Fall of Berlin,1994), but their history of the British in India is just as good. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2008

"A coherent rendering of this complex, tumultuous and little-known history."
The world was ripe for revolution in 1919—so thought Lenin and Trotsky. In reality, as Read (The Devil's Disciples: Hitler's Inner Circle, 2004, etc.) demonstrates, it was ripe for repression. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 6, 1994

"Berlin Is Still Berlin''), but chronologically ordered plates offer more pointed commentary to this fascinating subject."
A lively, rewarding history from the well-qualified authors of The Fall of Berlin (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1991

"An intriguing footnote to the history of WW II, then, which is longer on global perspectives than human-scale insights. (Sixteen pages of photographs-not seen.)"
A workmanlike reprise of a once-celebrated WW II espionage case, plus an assessment of its geopolitical implications. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FALL OF BERLIN by Anthony Read
NON-FICTION
Released: April 26, 1993

"Splendidly researched and admirably constructed, this stands as one of the best accounts yet of the war and its terrible toll."
A kaleidoscopic portrait of the last days of the Nazi Reich, narrated in the best apocalyptic style by British historian/journalists Read and Fisher (Kristallnacht, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >

BLOG POST

THIS WEEK IN AUDIOBOOKS
by Bobbi Dumas

Hope you all had a nice 4th of July!

It’s been a great week for me with audiobooks. I had the chance to listen to the upcoming Joshilyn Jackson title, The Almost Sisters (releases July 11; Kirkus gave it a star review).

I simply love Jackson, one of my favorite authors.  A beautiful, witty writer, she tells unique, lively ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FACT OF BLACKNESS by Alan Read
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Then, at least, it might have something to say. (20 b&w photos)"
This exploration of Frantz Fanon's continuing impact on the visual arts is a woefully maladroit collection of third-rate essays and dialogues. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRIENDS AT THRUSH GREEN by Miss Read
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 3, 1991

"Take a chapter or two before bedtime."
Miss Read's 34th Thrush Green idyll, illustrated as always by the gentle sketches of genteel chaps and aging lassies of John S. Goodall. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASH FALLS by Warren  Read
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2017

"A moody, haunting foray into rural Americana in the mold of Daniel Woodrell and Christian Kiefer."
A man's past haunts the citizens of an isolated, rural Pacific Northwest town. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Walking With the Enemy by C. Read
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 5, 2015

"An earnest, if occasionally redundant, description of one woman's rocky spiritual path."
Read offers her personal tale of religious awakening, including her experiences with people whom she says were falsely serving Jesus Christ. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES FROM A VILLAGE SCHOOL by Miss Read
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 1995

"With illustrations by Kate Dicker that, like the sketches of John Goodall (who usually does the honors for Read), are stiffly naive but somehow just right."
An incidental treat for those addicted to Miss Read's English village tales (Celebrations at Thrush Green, 1993, etc.), those slyly gentle vignettes of neighborly to-ing and fro-ing where civility rules and the countryside is splendidly unspoiled. Read full book review >