Search Results: "Antonio Hill"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GOOD SUICIDES by Antonio Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 17, 2014

"Another strong effort by the Spanish novelist, who again sets us up for the next installment of the series with a tantalizing ending."
In frigid Barcelona, senior members of a cosmetics company are dying by what appears to be suicide, each having received an email warning accompanied by a disturbing photo of dead dogs hanging from a tree. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMER OF DEAD TOYS by Antonio Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 18, 2013

"Ending with a teaser for the next novel featuring Inspector Salgado, this book gets the series off to a great start."
A teenage boy in Barcelona falls out a window to his death; whether he slipped or was pushed is only one of the gripping questions facing Inspector Héctor Salgado in this penetrating, atmospheric mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REQUIEM by Antonio Tabucchi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 27, 1994

"And yet the streamlike writing, spliced by endless commas, contains a charm that shines through the monochrome."
A short, food-filled fictional walk in and around the city of Lisbon by a distinguished Italian author and translator of Portuguese that culminates in a dream-time meeting with an unnamed writer who one assumes the poet Fernando Pessoa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WATCH WHERE THE WOLF IS GOING by Antonio Skármeta
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 30, 1991

"A ho-hum read."
A competent collection by Chilean writer Skarmeta, who explores typical Latin American themes but without the passion or imagination of so many of his peers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 31, 2001

"Good reading for critics of latter-day military culture, as well as students of ancient history."
A lucid study of battles, broken treaties, and arms races in Roman antiquity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEREIRA DECLARES by Antonio Tabucchi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1996

"One of the most intriguing and appealing character studies in recent European fiction, and easily the best work of Tabucchi's to have appeared in English translation."
The theme of political commitment is explored from an unusual and rewarding perspective in this moving short novel, set in Fascist-ruled Portugal in 1938, by the Italian author of Requiem (1994), etc. Its unsuspecting hero is Dr. Pereira, a former Lisbon crime reporter who now edits the ``culture page'' of the cautiously apolitical newspaper Lisboa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEAN TIME by Antonio Arreola
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: May 12, 2012

"What begins as a potentially intriguing story devolves into far-fetched, sentimental and, at times, intolerable chaos that doesn't do anyone justice."
This debut mystery explores thorny issues of rape, murder, justice and romance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 9, 2010

"Awareness may be mostly mystery, but Damasio shapes its hints and glimmerings into an imaginative, informed narrative."
Damasio (Director/Univ. of Southern California Brain and Creativity Inst.; Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain, 2003, etc.) seeks to understand "the mystery of consciousness." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MISSING HEAD by Antonio Tabucchi
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 26, 1999

"On the whole, the novel is an unlikely delight."
The latest from the eminent Italian author of Requiem (1994) and Pereira Declares (1996) once again explores the land and people of Portugal—this time in the form of a murder mystery whose initiating action is the discovery of a headless body near a gypsy encampment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIME AGES IN A HURRY by Antonio Tabucchi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 4, 2015

"A quibble: The title might have been more idiomatically rendered Time Gets Old in a Hurry, getting at the paradoxes and wordplay that Tabucchi loved. A pleasure all the same for fans of modern European literature."
A pensive, beautifully written meditation on personhood and nationhood in the new age of European unity. Read full book review >