Search Results: "Apps of All Nations"


BOOK REVIEW

iSTORY IT'S ABOUT LIFE by Apps of All Nations
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 17, 2011

"Sentimental, yes, but a refreshing dose of real emotion among hundreds of apps that are little more than wind-up digital toys. (iPad storybook app. 4-8)"
An unexpectedly poignant emotional punch to the gut, an illustrator's tribute to his father featuring a bear and his dad is touching and memorable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILD OF ALL NATIONS by Irmgard Keun
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Poignant, especially for contemporary readers who know that far greater horrors were still to come."
An utterly compelling look at pre-World War II Germany, first published in 1938 and available in English for the first time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 21, 1993

"A grand concept—as well as a searing indictment of an often cruel and malevolent regime—but Toer's agenda is more political treatise than a window into the human heart."
The second (This Earth of Mankind, 1991) in a quartet continues the often bittersweet story of the growing anticolonial movement in the Dutch-ruled Indonesia of the 1890's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BALLY, THE BALLOON DOG by Mara Colecchia
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 27, 2011

"A few bells and whistles fail to make this app soar. (iPad storybook app. 4-7)"
Bally meets up with three "real" dogs and through a series of events realizes that he's different. Will he ever fit in? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 30, 2014

"An important—even necessary—addition to the groaning shelves of Civil War volumes."
Before and during the Civil War, both North and South lobbied hard in key European capitals to convince officials and the general population of the justness of their causes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 6, 1995

"Informative, but a little more human interest would have given color to all those historical and social generalizations."
A history of New York City as varied as the metropolis itself, focusing on the immigrants who throughout the centuries have harkened to America's call and remade New York in their own image. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"More diagnosis than prescription, but the epidemiological view of swollen-wallet sickness makes for highly interesting reading."
The First World is fat but not happy, and its consumerist ways are spreading like an epidemic to the farthest reaches of the globe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Urbane and intelligent: a useful analysis of a rapidly changing phenomenon."
A timely look at nationalism, a phenomenon more often noted than analyzed, by Pfaff (Barbarian Sentiments, 1989, etc.), longtime political commentator for The New Yorker, The International Herald Tribune, and The Los Angeles Times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A NATION OF NATIONS by Tom Gjelten
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A timely, well-informed entry into a national debate."
An incisive look at immigration, assimilation, and national identity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2000

"In the tradition of Samuel Huntington's Clash of Civilizations, Barkan's study illustrates that religious and ethnic identities are increasingly pitted against the nation-state. This is an important and very necessary addition to post-Cold War political discourse."
A timely examination of how guilt, victimization, and restitution have become pervasive in the dialogue of global politics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HEALTH OF NATIONS by Karen Bartlett
NON-FICTION
Released: April 11, 2017

"Bartlett makes it abundantly clear that research to reduce the impact of infectious disease is progressing but that politics, budgetary constraints, competing priorities, and ego clashes are serious impediments."
Will the world ever be rid of infectious disease? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 18, 2011

"A vibrant picture of a growing sphere of trade that already employs half the workers of the world."
A close-up look at the world of unlicensed and unregulated trade, which, in many developing countries, is the fastest growing part of the economy. Read full book review >