Search Results: "April Ward"


BOOK REVIEW

NINTH WARD by Jewell Parker Rhodes
ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 16, 2010

"A good title for discussion when balanced with historical accounts of Katrina and her aftermath. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Born with a caul, 12-year-old Lanesha can see and sometimes communicate with spirits, and her guardian, former midwife Mama Ya-Ya, has dreams and visions that foretell the future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 22, 1992

"Superficial, then, but, for fans of medical drama, still a roller-coaster ride with plenty of peaks and plunges."
Stanley, a free-lance journalist from Portland, Oregon, chronicles her three-week sojourn as a fly on the wall in the labor-and-delivery unit of Oregon Health Services Univ. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1990

Whatever this pedestrian text may be, it's not the eyewitness testimony of a significant player in the cautionary drama of Drexel Burnham. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WARD by Jordana Frankel
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 30, 2013

"The checklist of what makes commercial teen dystopias may be complete here, but the clumsy writing and nonexistent worldbuilding prevent this subpar clone from making a splash. (Dystopian romance. 12-16)"
A society built atop a catastrophe-stricken United States of America, a feisty heroine torn between guys, an evil government—stop us if you've read this already. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ISOLATION WARD by Joshua Spanogle
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 28, 2006

"Readers of this engrossing and intellectually wrought first novel will happily await Spanogle's next."
A renegade virus strikes Baltimore and challenges the ethics of the medical community in med-student Spanogle's tightly woven debut thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIOLENT WARD by Len Deighton
Released: July 28, 1993

"Like sugarcoating on a pill, Mickey's lively patter makes the contorted, lumpy storyline easier to swallow—but this kind of bumptious California thriller really isn't Deighton's bag. (First printing of 125,000)"
What's a veteran cold war novelist to do when there's no more cold war? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2003

"History as it should be: informative but also lively, thrilling, and hugely entertaining."
A vivid, dramatic account of conspiracy and murder in 15th-century Florence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

APRIL RISING by Corene Lemaitre
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

"An equal mix of wacky humor and pathos—and an amiable first effort."
A quirky first novel, teetering on the edge of silliness, that nevertheless offers an incisive look at family relationships. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

APRIL 1865 by Jay Winik
NON-FICTION
Released: April 4, 2001

"Serves both as an engaging Civil War history and an object lesson in unanimity, goodwill, and civic duty. (photos and maps)"
A history of the last days of the Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRUEL APRIL by Neil Albert
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 10, 1995

"Albert's best book yet."
Somewhere between Miami, where she called to let him know she was boarding the plane, and Philadelphia, where he waited in vain for her to get off, PI Dave Garrett's girlfriend Kate McMahan disappeared. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGICIAN'S WARD by Patricia C. Wrede
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Something of an improvement over Mairelon the Magician (1991), but still leisurely, YA-ish, and lacking innovation."
No, not a hospital drama about ailing wizards, but another yarn set in a fantasy Regency England featuring Richard Merrill, a.k.a. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WRITING KIND OF DAY by Ralph Fletcher
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2005

"Black and white illustrations, in a range of styles from simple line drawings to what look like processed photos, add drab but atmospheric notes; the poet's simple language and wide variety of moods and topics may help to get young writers off the stick. (Poetry. 8-10)"
In 27 new, mostly free verses, Fletcher takes a young writer's voice, ruminating on metaphors, plagiarism and other writerly concepts, battling writer's block, or connecting one entry to the next. Read full book review >