Search Results: "Arlene Hirschfelder"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"An invaluable and attractive resource, particularly for younger children. (resources for further study, glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 7-11)"
A well thought-out, neatly executed, and extremely attractive volume that strives to fulfill the promise of its title. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"Still, the book includes a wealth of information and activities for classroom teachers or parents creating a home learning program. (glossary, list of Native American museums and cultural centers, list of festivals and powwows, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
More a guide for teachers and parents than for kids, this comprehensive volume offers much information about Native cultures past and present. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARLENE SARDINE by Chris Raschka
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The book's jacket, not incidentally, is painted to look like, read as, and 'open' like the tin lid of a sardine can; the entire book bristles with nonchalance, but makes its points with panache. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Raschka (Simple Gifts, p. 273, etc.) has a way of continually reinventing the picture-book form; here, in his signature splashy watercolors and brash calligraphy, he tells the story of how Arlene, a little fish who wants to be a sardine, achieves her career goal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NONFICTION
Released: May 1, 1992

"Notably memorable source material. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
From Maine to the Aleutians but largely from the West and Southwest; from the 19th century to the present, with a preponderance from the 60's and 70's; from young people whose white schooling estranged them from their tribes to those who view their heritage with pride—these 62 poems and essays testify eloquently to the richness, sorrows, and deep ambivalence of being Native American. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CARMINE'S STORY by Arlene Schulman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 20, 1997

"While Schulman has difficulty keeping the first-person narration distinctly childlike, especially when she's conveying technical information about HIV and AIDS, the story is a poignant look at one boy's short life, and the disease that was with him since birth. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
A sensitive, sorrowful photo-essay; Schulman exhibits no tendency to sugar-coat the troubled life of Carmine, who was born with the HIV virus and had full-blown AIDS since he was two. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HURRY GRANNY ANNIE by Arlene Alda
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Aldridge's watercolors, done in shimmering golden hues, illuminate the beauty of an autumn sunset; she also includes whimsical elements for astute observers. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A rollicking cross country sprint with their energetic grandmother leads siblings Ruthie and Joe and their friend to a wondrous discovery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE A FACE, THERE A FACE by Arlene Alda
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 11, 2008

"A short rhymed text helps to identify each object or locale. (Picture book. 4-6)"
The world takes on a decidedly animistic aspect in this photo album, as Alda's camera finds faces on trees and buildings, in the kitchen and the bathroom, in patterns on rugs, windows, the fronts of post-office mailboxes and even the slashes on round loaves of bread. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIG, HORSE, OR COW, DON'T WAKE ME NOW by Arlene Alda
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Without any serious attempt at integrating its elements, this book is no reason to jump out of bed. (Fiction/Picture book. 3-7)"
The concept is simple: Each animal on the farm, as it wakes up, rouses its neighbor, until, finally, the boy of the house rises and begins his day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELLO, GOOD-BYE by Arlene Alda
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 10, 2009

"Of course they are, particularly when compared to pumpkins and squashes, but it's still a novel way of seeing them, one that offers children (and adults) an enchanting new perspective. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Although it seems simple, the concept of opposites can be difficult for very young children to grasp. Read full book review >