Search Results: "Arlene Hirschfelder"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"An invaluable and attractive resource, particularly for younger children. (resources for further study, glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 7-11)"
A well thought-out, neatly executed, and extremely attractive volume that strives to fulfill the promise of its title. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"Still, the book includes a wealth of information and activities for classroom teachers or parents creating a home learning program. (glossary, list of Native American museums and cultural centers, list of festivals and powwows, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
More a guide for teachers and parents than for kids, this comprehensive volume offers much information about Native cultures past and present. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CARMINE'S STORY by Arlene Schulman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 20, 1997

"While Schulman has difficulty keeping the first-person narration distinctly childlike, especially when she's conveying technical information about HIV and AIDS, the story is a poignant look at one boy's short life, and the disease that was with him since birth. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
A sensitive, sorrowful photo-essay; Schulman exhibits no tendency to sugar-coat the troubled life of Carmine, who was born with the HIV virus and had full-blown AIDS since he was two. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NONFICTION
Released: May 1, 1992

"Notably memorable source material. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
From Maine to the Aleutians but largely from the West and Southwest; from the 19th century to the present, with a preponderance from the 60's and 70's; from young people whose white schooling estranged them from their tribes to those who view their heritage with pride—these 62 poems and essays testify eloquently to the richness, sorrows, and deep ambivalence of being Native American. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FRIENDSHIP BRACELET by Arlene Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2017

"Wooden and wordy. (Fiction. 8-12)"
When her best friend announces that she is moving to Paris, 11-year-old Olivia's life looks bleak, but new friends, a new crush, and a new project suggest that when life seems to be unraveling, it is just time to add some new thread. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCARY OLD SEX by Arlene Heyman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 8, 2016

"The stories in this keenly observed collection lay bare truths—some comforting, others uncomfortable—about love and sex, aging and acceptance."
This debut story collection by a New York-based psychiatrist/psychoanalyst with long-standing literary connections delves into the complicated relationships and intimate sex lives of mature couples. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST KIDS FROM THE BRONX by Arlene Alda
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2015

"Entertaining and informative cherished memories from a diverse group from the Bronx."
Short essays connected by a common thread: a childhood spent in the Bronx. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

23RD PRECINCT by Arlene Schulman
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 7, 2001

"A sharp and biting portrait that—despite real glimpses of dignity and courage—no police department is likely to pick up for recruiting purposes."
A fine, grim piece of living theater—a year spent with a New York City police precinct located in a shady part of town—from photographer and journalist Schulman (Carmine's Story, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Schulman goes a long way toward putting a human— if battered—face on a profession long in disrepute. (100 b&w photos)"
A sharp, affectionate portrait—in words and stunning photographs—of prizefighters in their milieu. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST TIME I SAW MOTHER by Arlene J. Chai
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 4, 1996

"A thin, less-than-riveting plot enhanced by graceful prose and a generously—at times too generously—evoked sense of place and period: a flawed but promising first outing."
Mother-daughter relationships with add-ons as debut novelist Chai expands to varying effect this trendy genre by including lessons on recent Philippine history. Read full book review >