Search Results: "Arthur Howard"


BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD HAWKS by Todd McCarthy
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"It portrays in wide-screen format a life until now presented only in sketches. (16 pages photos, not seen)"
A pleasingly thorough, if not critically groundbreaking, retrospective of the works and life of Hollywood's most versatile (and, to some cineasts, best) director. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARTHUR TURNS GREEN by Marc Brown
by Marc Brown, illustrated by Marc Brown, developed by ScrollMotion
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 23, 2011

"Overall, Arthur would probably agree this app is a fine way to save paper and still enjoy a good read. (iPad storybook app. 4-8)"
This adaptation of Brown's newest Arthur story offers pretty much the traditional experience of reading a book; the interactive features that are the hallmark of this new generation of the "book" experience are somewhat limited. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD ZINN by Martin Duberman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Recommended for readers already smitten with Zinn."
A star-struck biography of the prominent historian and activist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD HUGHES by Charles Higham
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1993

"Undeniably a hypnotic portrait of a great American monster."
An outing of the billionaire closet bisexual by Higham, whose bios include lives of Cary Grant, Brando, Orson Welles, the Duchess of Windsor, and L.B. Mayer, among others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARTHUR TURNS GREEN by Marc Brown
ANIMALS
Released: April 5, 2011

"Brown's familiar, brightly colored cartoon illustrations (printed in soy inks on recycled paper) feature schoolmates and family members sufficiently well identified that a new generation of Arthur readers could start with this timely title. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Working on a school project his teacher calls "the Big Green Machine," Arthur finds many ways to save energy at home but frightens his little sister D.W., who thinks he and their father and Arthur's friend Buster might really be turning green. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SERIOUS TROUBLE by Arthur  Howard
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Tucking plenty of wordplay into the brief text to complement his playful, loosely drawn illustrations, Howard produces another child-friendly episode, this one with an underlying message about parental expectations and being allowed to be one's own fool. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Another perceptive, deceptively cartoonish tale from Howard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOODWINKED by Arthur  Howard
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"These illustrations enhance and enrich an amusing story that is sure to please. (Picture book. 3-8)"
When it's time to choose a pet, a young witch named Mitzi requires something that is definitely not cute or cuddly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 14, 2011

"The definitive word on a loved, loathed, maddeningly complex broadcasting legend."
You could make a case that Howard Cosell (1918-1995) was the single most important sports broadcaster ever. You would be right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD WALLACE, P.I. by Casey Lyall
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Likely to see sequels; Howard and Ivy deserve them. (Mystery. 8-11)"
Grantleyville Middle School lowlifes beware: shamus Howard Wallace is on the case! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I WAS HOWARD HUGHES by Steven Carter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 17, 2003

"A darkly diverting, slightly cautionary tale about a barmy billionaire and his batty biographer."
First-novelist Carter hits the scene with a madly inventive mock bio. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN I WAS FIVE by Arthur  Howard
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

"A quietly comic work. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Jeremy tells what his life was like when he was five. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWARD THURMAN’S GREAT HOPE by Kai Jackson Issa
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"The author ends with Thurman's college graduation and never discusses his significance as a strong advocate of nonviolence—but readers may be tempted by the text's very spareness to seek out more information about him and his legacy. (Picture book/biography. 7-9)"
Though rigidly purposeful, this important profile introduces young readers to a Civil Rights Movement figure who should be better known. Read full book review >