Search Results: "Arthur C. Clarke"


BOOK REVIEW

ARTHUR C. CLARKE by Neil McAleer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Useful to specialists and students of sf, but likely to disappoint the more general reader. (Thirty b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Science journalist McAleer (The Mind-Boggling Universe, 1987; The Body Almanac, 1985) turns his attention to one of the giants of his own field. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLLECTED STORIES OF ARTHUR C. CLARKE by Arthur C. Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Wonder."
A massive compendium brings together (most probably) every story—104 in total, at least 3 previously uncollected—ever written by grandmaster Clarke (3001: The Final Odyssey, 1997, etc). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1986

"This note of optimism and a long, Clarke-at-his-best description of life in a 2019 space station (based on present experience) lift the book out of the veil of joyless hardware."
The date is the 50th anniversary of the moonwalk, 17 years ago (ergo, 33 years hence). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HAMMER OF GOD by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 15, 1993

"Stretched mighty thin—despite padding with docudrama snippets—but agreeably handled and sturdily credible."
Expansion of a short story (published in a fall 1992 issue of Time magazine) about the possibility of an asteroid colliding with Earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SANDS OF MARS by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1991

"Not completely gossamer."
SF novelization in which technicalities are subdued for story line so that even the uninitiated may comprehend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 15, 1990

"Average Clarke, more emotional than usual, with excellent extrapolation of future technologies."
Clarke returns to underwater exploration, a la The Deep Range, and Big Engineering, a la The Fountains of Paradise, in this story set in the first 12 years of the 21st century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1990

"Charming—Clarke loves his subject, and it shows—and effortlessly informative while maintaining a perfect balance between affection and skepticism."
Clarke rambles nostalgically through the odd early days of the influential pulp science-fiction magazine, Astounding Tales of Super-Science, in a warmly appreciative yet far from uncritical tribute to sf's beginnings-cum-personal memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1967

"Excitement inherent in the subject and the challenge of its concepts should appeal."
On October 4, 1957, the rehearsal of a Philharmonic orchestra about to launch Peter and the Wolf suddenly stopped as its members quietly withdrew. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1965

Subtitled "An Omnibus," this collection contains the author's early classic Prelude to Space and his later novel The Sands of Mars along with sixteen short stories on both the "light" and the "dark" side of space. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 1962

"Further, he systematizes nothing; there are no socio-cultural parallels drawn; man, as we've known him, vanishes completely in this gala inquiry into the limits of the possible."
Arthur Clarke is the high lama of science fiction and non-fiction; as an astrophysicist he wrote The Exploration of Space; with a Wellsian imagination he concocted Childhood's End. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALL OF MOONDUST by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Sept. 13, 1961

"Able science-fiction here."
Captain Harris of the Selene faces the question of rescuing 22 people when the airboat sinks into the sea of dust on the Moon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1959

"This has broader appeal than his other books which are already standbys in bookstores and libraries."
Twenty articles concerning the impact of the coming space age on mankind written by the former chairman of the British Interplanetary Society and one of the most imaginative, scientifically oriented writers of space literature today. Read full book review >